Another Yankees scandal! Well, OK, maybe not.

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This is a weird story:  The Yankees have run “subway races” on their scoreboard for a few years now. Basically they’re the on-screen equivalent of the racing sausages or presidents or what have you. Lots of parks do it with various characters. Subways, dots, ducks, etc.

Until this year, the three racing subways had always been labeled as the B train, the D train and the number 4 train, which are the three subway lines that serve Yankee Stadium.  For complicated reasons that sound more like a “Three’s Company” episode than a business negotiation over naming rights for an animated feature, the Yankees ended up changing the labeling to “Road Gray,” “Midnight Blue” and “Pinstripes” this season.  This angered people. Partially because people don’t like change. Partially because people don’t like dumb things.

Anyway, it all seems to be resolved now, as MTA and the Yankees have agreed to change things back to B, D and 4 starting tonight. This, I think, is a good thing.

For my part, the “racing whatevers” thing is done well in Milwaukee and everyplace else is derivative or lame.  Especially when it’s contrived and one of the racers — like Teddy Roosevelt at Nats Park or Mustard at Columbus Clippers games — never get to win.  It’s tired. My suggestion is that we should replace these contests with something more … interesting.

Like a hunt. For the most dangerous prey of all: man.

Anthony DeSclafani crushed a grand slam for his first career home run

Anthony DeSclafani
AP Images
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Reds right-hander Anthony DeSclafani put on a show during Saturday’s matinee against the Cubs. Up 2-1 in the third inning, the hurler hooked a Brian Duensing fastball over the left field fence for his first career home run — and first career grand slam:

Grand slams are impressive no matter the player or situation, but they’re made all the more special in rare circumstances like this one. Not only is DeSclafani the first pitcher to deliver a grand slam in 2018, but he’s the first Reds hurler to do so in nearly 60 years. Per MLB.com’s Brian Scott Rippee, right-hander Bob Purkey was the last to hit a slam for the Reds in 1959, when he took Cubs reliever John Buzhardt deep in the third inning of a 12-3 drubbing.

The 28-year-old righty had a decent outing on the mound as well, holding the Cubs to two runs, four walks, and three strikeouts over 6 1/3 innings before passing the ball to reliever Michael Lorenzen. Entering Saturday, he carried a 2-1 record in three games, with a 4.60 ERA, 2.3 BB/9 and 8.6 SO/9 across 15 2/3 innings — not too shabby for someone who hasn’t pitched in the majors since 2016.

The Reds currently lead 8-2 in the bottom of the seventh.