The Indians have made a really nice promotional video

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I’ve been linking to various team’s promotional videos this spring. I know they’re advertisements, but I find them interesting. Some are funny. Some are effective. Some are awful.

The Indians have what may be the most moving one I’ve seen so far.  Check it out.

Biggest reason I like it: it doesn’t shy away from the dark parts of being an Indians fan. There’s footage of Edgar Renteria’s hit in 1997 and the final out of the 1995 World Series against the Braves in the thing, for cryin’ out loud. There’s footage of Albert Belle. There’s an understanding and appreciation of the fact that fans are there for the highs and the lows and that the lows are every bit a part of what makes us a fan as the highs are.

It’s so easy to play the “[Insert your team’s name here] baseball! It’s Faaaaantastic!” card, yet the Indians resisted. Nice job.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.