Colby Rasmus’ family members are hanging out in the HBT comments, arguing about stuff

26 Comments

You never know who you might run into in the HardballTalk comments section. Last week Curt Flood’s son stopped by to respond to an article about his dad and now it sure seems like a member of Colby Rasmus’ family is hanging out and arguing about stuff.

Someone using the screen name “trasmus3” has made a series of comments dating back to last week and continuing until just minutes ago. For whatever reason I initially assumed it was Rasmus’ brother, but then I remembered that Rasmus’ dad, Tony Rasmus, made headlines in the past for posting stuff on Cardinals-related blogs and message boards.

Here’s the exchange “trasmus3” has been having with a commenter named “spudchukar” in my post from last week naming Rasmus as one of my “breakout picks” for 2011:

spudchukar: Since he is a Georgia boy, and there have been rumors of him being interested in playing for the Braves, what would you think of a Rasmus/Heyward deal?

trasmus3: He is not a Georgia boy. He is from Alabama. Always has been. Always will be. His brother plays on the Braves farm team.

trasmus3: But his brother is from Alabama too. lol

spudchukar: According to Wikipedia, UPI, MLB, Baseball-Reference, Bing, and ESPN, Colby Rasmus was born in Columbus, GA

trasmus3: Well, according to his mom, his dad, his grandad, his grandmom, his high school (In Alabama), his 1998 little league world series record, his 3 brothers he is an Alabama boy/man. Maybe that is a bit of the problem in the US. People have a tendancy to believe the media and anybody else that makes a post that is inaccurate. Being born across the river in Columbus does not make u a Georgia boy. Where you live probably has more depth to the statement and definately if his momma says he is an Alabama boy that ends the discussion. lol

LOL, indeed. In addition to arguing about where Rasmus is from, our hero “trasmus3” also had a couple other exchanges. For instance, here’s his response to someone comparing Rasmus to “overpaid J.D. Drew”:

It sure would be nice if he would get overpayed. At the moment he definately is not.

And here’s his response to someone saying “I’d like to see him mature and realize his potential”:

Every year every male matures a bit. Then before you know it, we catch up to the females.

As someone who had to block the IP address on his mother’s computer to keep her from commenting on his blog constantly, I find this whole thing incredibly amusing. I love it all, from the place of birth arguments and wisdom about women to the misspellings and frequent use of “LOL.” Please don’t leave, “trasmus3”!

Major League Baseball told Kolten Wong to ditch Hawaii tribute sleeve

Getty Images
1 Comment

Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Major League Baseball has told Cardinals infielder Kolten Wong that he has to get rid of the colorful arm sleeve he’s been wearing, pictured above, that pays tribute to his native Hawaii and seeks to raise awareness of recovery efforts from the destruction caused by the erupting Mount Kilauea.

Goold:

[Wong] has been notified by Major League Baseball that he will face a fine if he continues to wear an unapproved sleeve that features Hawaiian emblem. Wong said he will stash the sleeve, like Jose Martinez had to do with his Venezuelan-flag sleeve, and find other ways to call attention to his home island.

Willson Contreras was likewise told to ditch his Venezuela sleeve.

None of these guys are being singled out, it seems. Rather, this is all part of a wider sweep Major League Baseball is making with respect to the uniformity of uniforms. As Goold notes at the end of his piece, however, MLB has no problem whatsoever with players wearing a non-uniform article of underclothing as long as it’s from an MLB corporate sponsor. Such as this sleeve worn by Marcell Ozuna, and supplied by Nike that, last I checked, were not in keeping with the traditional St. Louis Cardinals livery:

ST. LOUIS, MO – MAY 22: Marcell Ozuna #23 of the St. Louis Cardinals celebrates after recording his third hit of the game against the Kansas City Royals in the fifth inning at Busch Stadium on May 22, 2018 in St. Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images)

If Nike was trying to get people to buy Hawaii or Venezuela compression sleeves, I’m sure there would be no issue here. They’re not, however, and it seems like creating awareness and support for people suffering from natural, political and humanitarian disasters do not impress the powers that be nearly as much.