On second thought, Luis Castillo is a pretty popular guy

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Luis Castillo became symbolic of the failures of former Mets general manager Omar Minaya, so most expected him to be cut loose prior to Opening Day, even though he was arguably the team’s best option at second base. But when someone is cut based more on perception than reality, we shouldn’t be surprised when said player draws interest once they can be had for the league minimum.

According to Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com, the Phillies, Cubs and Marlins are at least three teams “thought to be in” on Castillo. The rationale is pretty simple here. The Phillies need insurance for Chase Utley, the Cubs aren’t thrilled with Blake DeWitt and Jeff Baker and the Marlins could use Omar Infante at third base and start prospect Matt Dominguez in the minors.

As Castillo tells Enrique Rojas of ESPN Deportes, he hopes to sign with the major league team shortly after he clears waivers on Sunday.

“I feel calm, confident that I will be in a major league roster on opening day of the season,” Castillo said in phone call in Spanish with ESPNDeportes.com.

“Until Sunday I can not talk of contract, but I’m sure I have options. I am not finished as it has been painted,” Castillo said, adding he did not hold a grudge against the Mets.

If anything, being released could be a liberating experience for the 35-year-old. The three-time Gold Glover doesn’t have the range he once did, but he knows his way around the second base bag better than most. And while he’s just a Punch-and-Judy-hitter, he makes good contact and knows how to draw a walk. For $6 million, he wouldn’t make any sense. For $414,000? Sure, why not?

I, for one, look forward to reading Jon Heyman’s reaction when Castillo signs a contract before David Eckstein.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.