Scott Podsednik to wear cast on left foot for at least 10 days

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Scott Podsednik’s setback with the plantar fasciitis in his left foot means that he’ll be wearing a cast for at least the next 10 days, according to Gregor Chisholm of MLB.com.

That means the earliest he’d be able to resume baseball activities is March 25, which would leave Podsednik less than a week to get ready for the Blue Jays’ season opener against the Twins. In other words, he’s all but certain to begin the season on the disabled list or, because he signed a non-guaranteed minor-league contract, at Triple-A.

All of which makes Podsednik’s misguided decision to turn down a one-year, $2 million deal from the Dodgers back in November look like an even bigger mistake. At best he’ll make just half that money with the Blue Jays and at worst–which is what we’re seeing so far given the foot injury–he’ll end up spending much of the year earning significantly less than that while rehabbing or riding buses in the minors.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.