Justin Duchscherer back to square one with hip problems?

2 Comments

Justin Duchscherer missed most of last season following hip surgery and today the oft-injured right-hander indicated to Jeff Zrebiec of the Baltimore Sun that the problem that forced him to go under the knife has returned.

He’s currently waiting to see the results of an arthrogram, but in what Zrebiec described as “an ominous comment” Duscherer said: “The best I can describe it is it felt like it did last year before I had to have it operated on.”

Duchscherer was scratched from his scheduled simulated game Sunday when he had difficulty getting loose and he certainly sounds like someone who expects to receive bad news, but the Orioles will likely know more about his status later today or early tomorrow. Baltimore is on the hook for just $700,000 in guaranteed money for Duchscherer, who must stay healthy to earn the various incentives in his one-year deal.

UPDATE: Zrebiec reports that the arthrogram “showed nothing new” and Duchscherer will be re-evaluated later this week.

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
4 Comments

Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.