Why aren’t more MLB general managers former MLB players?

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As a follow-up to Ruben Amaro Jr.’s recent four-year contract extension with the Phillies, Jayson Stark of ESPN.com has an interesting article about how only three of the 30 current general managers played in the big leagues.

Amaro is one, along with Kenny Williams of the White Sox and Billy Beane of the A’s. And together they had a total of 536 career hits. Amaro, Williams, and Beane have all had considerably more success as GMs, so why aren’t more former players getting the gig?

I think one big reason is that being a GM is about far more than just signing players and making trades. Back when Terry Ryan stepped down as GM of the Twins in late 2007 he talked about still loving the player-evaluation part of the job, but no longer wanting to have the other responsibilities that came along with it. And his replacement, Bill Smith, has focused more on those “other” aspects of being a GM while his top assistant, Rob Antony, and various other front office members take on a bigger role in player evaluation.

Minnesota is just one example, of course, but my sense is that applies to many and perhaps even most teams across MLB. When fans think of a GM they may imagine a guy making phone calls to other teams, sitting down with agents to hammer out contract details, and talking to scouts about which players they ought to target. In reality there’s a lot more “general” managing going on, and while many former big leaguers are no doubt very good at evaluating players they may not be quite as good at running the day-to-day or business side of things. Or at least not as good as the increasing number of Ivy League-educated GMs.

Obviously some GMs thrive at both aspects of the job, and it’s probably not a coincidence that Amaro and Williams both attended Stanford University and Beane was headed to Stanford prior to signing with the Mets out of high school. In many ways they’re extremely smart guys who just happen to be former players. I’m sure there are many more than three guys capable of hitting a curveball and being the face of a huge organization, but the modern GM job calls for a lot more than just deciding who to sign or trade and playing baseball at the highest level isn’t necessarily the best way to prepare for those other responsibilities.

Report: Red Sox sign Kenley Jansen to 2-year, $32 million deal

Dale Zanine-USA TODAY Sports
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SAN DIEGO — Veteran closer Kenley Jansen and the Boston Red Sox have agreed to a two-year, $32 million deal, a person familiar with the deal told The Associated Press.

The person spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because the agreement was pending a physical.

The 35-year-old Jansen went 5-2 with a 3.38 ERA in 64 innings for Atlanta this year. The three-time All-Star led the National League with 41 saves, helping the Braves win the NL East title.

Boston is looking to bounce back after it finished last in the AL East this season with a 78-84 record. The Red Sox went 92-70 in 2021 and lost to Houston in the AL Championship Series.

Jansen spent his first 12 seasons with the Los Angeles Dodgers, winning a World Series title in 2020. The right-hander signed a $16 million, one-year contract with Atlanta in March.

Jansen has a 2.46 career ERA. He was an All-Star in 2016-2018.

His 391 career saves are the second-most among active players (behind Craig Kimbrel‘s 394) and eighth all time.