MLB network to air footage of the Big Train, the Georgia Peach and the Sultan of Swat

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This is neat: The MLB Network got its hand on some rare 9.5mm footage of Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb and Walter Johnson warming up at an event at Yankee Stadium in 1924. There’s a small snippet of it in this promo here, though you have to watch Harold Reynolds and Al Leiter farting around for a minute before you see it.

The footage seems to be in great condition and shows shows several slow motion shots of Ruth’s and Cobb’s swings and Johnson’s side-arm delivery. A delivery that — despite his and Randy Johnson’s outrageous velocity, unmatched success and uncommon durability with it — I am shocked more pitchers don’t use.

The footage will air in its entirety on the MLB Network tonight at 6PM Eastern 7PM Eastern. Now would be a good time for me to vent my anger that my cable company is terrible and does not carry the MLB Network and that it ought to be ashamed of itself.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.