Bill Hall calls Cole Hamels “a marked man” following on-field shouting match

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During this afternoon’s Astros-Phillies game Bill Hall stepped out of the batters’ box to stop from being quick-pitched by Cole Hamels and Hamels responded by throwing the next pitch inside, at which point Zachary Levine of the Houston Chronicle reports that Hall had to be “restrained by home plate umpire Laz Diaz.”

It didn’t go much further than that, as neither bench emptied and both sides were simply issued warnings, but after the game Hall called Hamels “a marked man.”

However, according to Levine it was “not in any sort of way that would imply physical harm, but that he might have taken a little extra delight off the hit he got in his next at-bat.” Hmm.

Here’s more from a very angry Hall:

I don’t know if he was mad because he gave up a homer or if he was mad because the umpire gave me time. But I’m not going to let him speed-pitch me. Obviously, he threw a pitch in, and I’m not going to let him disrespect me either. He kind of said something that I didn’t like too much. It’s over with.

He’s definitely a marked man for me now, so when I do some damage off him, I’m going to let him know I did some damage off him. I can guarantee that. I don’t feel like I do a lot of things to have pitchers mad at me for doing things on the field. I feel like I play the game the right way. But if you disrespect me, I’m going to do my best to disrespect you back. Obviously not in a way to disrespect the game, but obviously I’m going to let him know when I face him.

Hall is just 3-for-22 (.136) with seven strikeouts against Hamels during his career, so if that continues Hall won’t have a whole lot of chances to “let him know I did some damage off him.”

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.