Thankfully for Nationals fans, F.P. Santangelo isn’t Rob Dibble

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Rob Dibble was fired as the Nationals’ television analyst following comments he made about Stephen Strasburg, but before that he’d more than earned the firing with various other “controversial” statements and, most importantly, awful announcing.

Included among Dibble’s many faults as an announcer was that he referred to “we” and “us” while openly cheering for the Nationals. It’s one thing to be a homer, as many local announcers are, but it’s another thing to be a grunting cheerleader who doesn’t even pretend to have any sort of objectivity.

All of which is why Nationals fans should be pleased to hear how much different the team’s new television announcer, F.P. Santangelo, plans to be in the broadcast booth. Here’s his response when Kristen Hudak of MASNSports.com asked “when is it OK to use ‘us’ or ‘we’ while broadcasting?”:

It’s never appropriate. I’m not wearing a uniform, so it’s not we. It’s absolutely against everything I’ve been taught as a broadcaster to ever say “we” because I’m sitting up here with makeup on and a coat and a tie. So it’s the Nationals and it will always be the Nationals on every broadcast I do. I was taught by some of the best announcers in baseball–Jon Miller, Duane Kuiper, Mike Krukow and Dave Flemming, the broadcast crew for the Giants. One of the first things I learned was that you say “we” when you’re wearing a uniform. I’m not wearing a uniform anymore so it will never be “we.”

Santangelo discussed a whole bunch of other stuff in his lengthy interview with Hudak. I haven’t heard him call a game yet, but I already like him more than Dibble.

Report: White Sox acquire Yonder Alonso from Indians

Yonder Alonso
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The White Sox have reportedly picked up first baseman Yonder Alonso from the Indians, according to Stadium. The return for Alonso is expected to be nothing more flashy than a “fringe prospect,” though the minutiae of the deal is still pending a formal announcement from both teams.

Alonso, 31, inked a two-year deal with the Indians during the 2017 offseason. His first campaign with the club yielded a modest .250/.317/.421 batting line, 23 home runs, .738 OPS and 0.7 fWAR in 574 PA. The real boon for the White Sox may not be a passable veteran bat, however, but something more intangible — like Alonso’s clout with his brother-in-law and highly-coveted free agent slugger, Manny Machado.

While Alonso’s 2018 output represented a significant decline from the career-best numbers he posted in 2017, he’s still a solid contributor at the plate and, more importantly, slated to remain under team control for the next two years with just $8 million owed in 2019 and a $9 million option in 2020. As MLB.com’s Anthony Castrovince notes, the $17 million the Indians just erased from their payroll should give them enough room to accommodate the contracts for right-handers Trevor Bauer and Corey Kluber — a bonus regardless of what they happen to get in the trade.