Tigers infielder Ramon Santiago “could be a possibility” for Phillies as Chase Utley insurance

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Danny Knobler, who covered the Tigers in Detroit prior to working at CBSSports.com, reports that Ramon Santiago “could be a possibility” for the Phillies as they look to add depth following the latest news on Chase Utley’s knee injury.

Santiago has split time at shortstop for the Tigers during the past few seasons, but is slated to be a backup this year after the team re-signed midseason pickup Jhonny Peralta to a two-year, $11.25 million deal.

Santiago has logged more than 3,000 career innings at shortstop and another 950 innings at second base, but aside from a flukey .870 OPS in a part-time role a few years ago the 31-year-old switch-hitter hasn’t offered much production offensively. Of course, even his measly .681 OPS during the past two seasons is better than the .665 OPS posted by Wilson Valdez, who’s the most likely in-house option to replace Utley.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.