Someone should tell Nyjer Morgan to stop trying to steal bases

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Nyjer Morgan was caught stealing twice in yesterday’s game (although one came on a botched hit-and-run try) and manager Jim Riggleman revealed that he gave Morgan a little pep talk in the dugout following the first failed steal attempt:

I said, “You know what? It seems like they throw the ball right on the button.” He never gets a break. I just wanted him to stay positive and realize the catcher made a great throw. That’s baseball. He was aggressive [and] the catcher made a great throw. When Nyjer’s out there, they’re on their “A game” in terms of stopping him from running.

Just a friendly tip for Riggleman: It’s not that opposing catchers are “on their ‘A game'” when Morgan is running, it’s that Morgan is such a low-percentage base-stealer that he makes catchers look good. Morgan led the league in caught stealing last season and in 2009, getting gunned down 17 times each year. For his career he’s 92-for-134 on the bases, which is a “success” rate of 68.6 percent that qualifies as terrible (for comparison, Carl Crawford has a success rate of 81.9 percent).

Saying catchers step up their game when Morgan runs is like saying pitchers step up their game when Jack Wilson is at the plate or hitters step up their game when Oliver Perez is on the mound. Nyjer Morgan is very fast, but he’s an awful base-stealer and his awful stolen base percentages have far more to do with him than with catchers. The statement “he never gets a break” is only accurate if Riggleman was referring to Morgan’s inability to get a good jump from first base.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.