Chase Utley’s status for Opening Day in doubt as he seeks “additional opinions” on knee injury

35 Comments

As expected, the Phillies’ announcement this morning regarding Chase Utley’s knee injury doesn’t contain any good news.

Team trainer Michael Ciccotti issued a statement saying that the knee problems have not responded to treatment as well as they have in the past and “an MRI was obtained that demonstrated his prior tendinitis, chondromalacia, and bone inflammation.”

Ciccotti went on to say that “continued non-operative treatment is being carried out and additional opinions will be obtained.”

In other words, the Phillies will continue to treat the injury without surgery but going under the knife (or “additional options”) may eventually be required.

Todd Zolecki of MLB.com has the full statement, which includes a whole bunch of doctorspeak that’s not likely to make Phillies fans feel very good.

As for Utley’s return timetable, Matt Gelb of the Philadelphia Inquirer writes that general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. “wouldn’t rule out Opening Day … but also downplayed the importance of players being ready for Opening Day.”

Which is another way of saying Utley being in the Opening Day lineup is now unlikely and the Phillies are facing the possibility of extended middle infield action for utility man Wilson Valdez for a second straight season. Valdez started 75 games in place of Utley at second base and Jimmy Rollins at shortstop last season, hitting just .258 with a .667 OPS and remarkable 20 double plays in 363 plate appearances.

Japanese Baseball to begin June 19

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Japanese League commissioner Atsushi Saito announced that Japan’s professional baseball season will open on June 19. Teams can being practice games on June 2. There will be no fans. Indeed, the league has not yet even begun to seriously discuss a plan for fans to begin attending games, though that may happen eventually.

The season will begin three months after its originally scheduled opening day of March 20. It will be 120 games long. Teams in each six-team league — the Central League and Pacific League — will play 24 games against each league opponent. There will be no interleague play and no all-star game.

The announcement came in the wake of a national state of emergency being lifted for both Tokyo and the island of Hokkaido. The rest of the country emerged from the state of emergency earlier this month. This will allow the Japanese leagues to follow leagues in South Korea and Taiwan which have been playing for several weeks.

In the United States, Major League Baseball is hoping to resume spring training in mid June before launching a shortened regular season in early July. That plan is contingent on the league and the players’ union coming to an agreement on both financial arrangements and safety protocols for a 2020 season. Negotiations on both are ongoing. Major League Baseball will, reportedly, make a formal proposal about player compensation tomorrow.