Utley underwent MRI on right knee Saturday

8 Comments

From Jim Salisbury of CSN Philly comes word that second baseman Chase Utley underwent an MRI on his right knee Saturday.

The test showed no structural damage, but Utley is battling patellar tendinitis and won’t play in the Phillies’ first handful of Grapefruit League games.

The Phillies are also going to limit the amount of running and fielding drills that he participates in for the next week, according to Matt Gelb of the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Utley, 32, played in only 115 games last season, but that was because of a thumb injury. This new knee issue should blow over with several days of rest and rehab. He was not administered a cortisone or lubricant shot and Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. didn’t sound all that concerned when he addressed the matter on Sunday morning in camp.

Report: Mariners enter into a ballpark naming rights deal with T-Mobile

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Maury Brown of Forbes reports that T-Mobile will be the new naming rights partner for the Seattle Mariners’ ballpark beginning in 2019. Their park had been known as Safeco Field since it first opened in the summer of 1999. The 20-year naming rights deal with Safeco ended with the close of the 2018 season.

Brown reports that the deal will be around $3 million a year, which doesn’t seem like a whole lot. Then again, I have long been skeptical of how much naming rights actually bring back to the naming rights partner. That’s especially true when the partner is slapping its name on a ballpark that was known as something else beforehand. People tend to still use the old name and, I suspect, resent the new one a bit. Maybe that’s less the case when the park has only been known by corporate names, and no beloved traditional name is being displaced, but I still question if anyone really makes a single purchasing decision based on the name of a ballpark.

I know this much for sure, though: despite the relatively small cost of naming rights here, none of the most notable Seattle-based companies — which include Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, Microsoft, Costco and Alaska Airlines — felt it was worth it. Possibly because they know people are gonna call the place “Safeco” for several years regardless.