Juan Pierre is a beast

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I got to the Dbacks’ camp pretty early yesterday. Earlier than a lot of writers did. But almost all the players were there before I was. That’s just what they do this time of year  And one player — Juan Pierre — was at White Sox camp earlier than all of the other players are:

One of the hardest working players in baseball, this is how his day begins every morning during spring training. He’s a man with an internal clock that’s always ticking, ready to rock well before the rooster crows.

“It’s just a routine. Something I follow and believe in. It’s kept me around this long,” says the speedy White Sox outfielder, who stole a career-high 68 bases in 2010, his 11th in the big leagues and first on the South Side.

Nothing stops Pierre from his early morning ritual. Well, except for one thing: The front door.

And that’s because it’s locked. Pierre gets to the clubhouse before even the security guys get there. Before 6AM each day, ready to work his butt off.

There is a lot of false hustle in spring training. Guys who reported to camp early, maybe because they’re truly dedicated, but maybe because they were bored. Guys who show up early each day, maybe because they want to work like Pierre does, but maybe because they want to hang out in the clubhouse and read the paper and b.s. with the guys as they stroll in. The managers know who’s who, however. In this case the media seems to have figured it out too.

And in this case there’s an explanation for why Juan Pierre, for all of his deficiencies as a ballplayer, manages to put together a nice year every couple of years and why he always has the confidence of his managers and coaches. The dude works. And sometimes work makes up for everything.

The Mets expect Tim Tebow to come back next year

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Mets assistant general manager John Ricco told Newsday today that he expects minor league outfielder Tim Tebow to return for a third season in professional baseball.

Tebow, 31, broke the hamate bone in his right hand while swinging a bat in late July, ending his season. It was a fairly successful season for him all things considered. After being promoted to Double-A Binghamton to start the year he hit .273/.336/.399 with six home runs, a stolen base and a .734 OPS in 298 plate appearances and made the Double-A All-Star team. That’s not the stuff of a top prospect — he strikes out far too much and the power numbers aren’t fantastic given that power would figure to be his strongest tool — but it’s pretty respectable for a guy his age and with his relative lack of baseball experience. As I said back in July, you can believe the Mets’ interest in Tebow is more marketing than baseball, but that does not preclude you from giving the guy a deserved tip of the cap for working hard and sticking it out in the bush leagues.

Assuming he does come back, the Mets are likely to start him at Triple-A Syracuse in the hopes that he’d eventually get to the bigs as a late season callup if the Mets aren’t in contention. Indeed, many believed that was the plan for him this year had he not been injured.