J.D. Drew, alligator hunting expert/crazy person

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Peter Abraham of the Boston Globe has an amusing anecdote from Red Sox camp in Florida, where NESN announcer Don Orsillo spotted an alligator in the pond behind the condo he’s living in and wondered whether it could be hunted.

J.D. Drew was eventually brought in as the expert, because he’s from Florida and, as Abraham writes, is familiar with hunting gators:

According to J.D., you can hunt alligators with a bow and arrow or a gun. Or you can use his method. Drew said he was in a boat with his son once when they hooked an alligator with a fishing lure. He had his son hold the pole and took position to try and leap on the alligator. “I figured I could get him myself,” he said. “He was about five or six feet.”

“With your bare hands?” I asked.

J.D. gave me his best “no, you stupid city boy” look. “I had a knife,” he said.

But the line snapped and the gator got away. J.D. missed his chance. So next time you read about J.D. missing a game with a bad hamstring and consider complaining, consider that this is a guy who was willing to jump out of a perfectly good boat and attack a man-sized alligator with a knife.

My dad once asked me to hold the hood of his car up while he changed the oil and I had to think twice about it, so it’s worth noting that Drew’s kid seems pretty badass too.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.