Ryan Braun says Brewers were “fighting the negativity” under former manager Ken Macha

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Ryan Braun talked to Tom Haudricourt of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel about how excited he is for this season after the Brewers added Zack Greinke and Shaun Marcum to the rotation and changed managers, and in doing so revealed just how bad things got in the clubhouse under former manager Ken Macha:

My confidence never wavered but overall the baseball experience last year was not positive. Ultimately, I think we were all fighting the negativity and the overall situation we were dealing with. I always try to be as positive and optimistic as I can but the whole environment and atmosphere, not necessarily with the players, was negative. It felt worse than it was. It felt like we lost 100 games.

Braun then discussed how different things already feel under new manager Ron Roenicke:

It’s a thousand times different now. The whole atmosphere, the whole environment is much more positive. There’s just an aura of excitement. When you walk in here, you can literally feel the difference. We can all sense it and it’s exciting. The more positive your work environment is, the more conducive it is to accomplishing anything you can to be successful. He was really positive and optimistic and he was a great communicator. I think those things are something we all look for in a leader and a manager.

Braun stopped short of ever mentioning Macha by name, but the former manager’s people skills were repeatedly brought up as a reason for his firing. Macha later explained that Braun, Prince Fielder, and other key players didn’t reciprocate his communication attempts, saying about Braun: “I talked a lot to Ryan almost every day, but he does his own thing. He’s going to do what he wants to do.”

Hunter Pence is mashing for the Rangers

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Hunter Pence was thought to be on his way to retirement after a lackluster 2018 season with the Giants. As he entered his mid-30’s, Pence spent a considerable amount of time on the injured list, playing in 389 out of 648 possible regular season games with the Giants from 2015-18.

Pence, however, kept his career going, inking a minor league deal with the Rangers in February. He performed very well in spring training, earning a spot on the Opening Day roster. Pence hasn’t stopped hitting.

Entering Monday night’s game against the Mariners, Pence was batting .299/.358/.619 with eight home runs and 28 RBI in 109 plate appearances, mostly as a DH. Statcast agrees that Pence has been mashing the ball. He has an average exit velocity of 93.3 MPH this season, which would obliterate his marks in each of the previous four seasons since Statcast became a thing. His career average exit velocity is 89.8 MPH. He has “barreled” the ball 10.4 percent of the time, well above his 6.2 percent average.

What Pence did to a baseball in the seventh inning of Monday’s game, then, shouldn’t come as a surprise.

That’s No. 9 on the year for Pence. Statcast measured it at 449 feet and 108.3 MPH off the bat. Not only is Pence not retired, he may be a lucrative trade chip for the Rangers leading up to the trade deadline at the end of July.