Miguel Cabrera probably won’t do any jail time

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That’s what a Florida DUI expert who Jon Paul Morosi spoke with said. And it’s not because he’s a big baseball star: people with Cabrera’s record who did what Cabrera did — including the resisting arrest stuff — generally don’t do any jail time.  They tend to get a six-month license suspension, community service, and an obligation to attend “DUI school.”

I don’t really know anything about DUI law. I had a client call me at midnight once saying he was getting arrested for DUI. He called me after he was pulled over and before the cop even got to his window. I knew I was out of my depth and called a lawyer who knew what he was talking about to deal with him.  I also once took a taped seminar on DUI law to satisfy continuing legal education requirements, but spent most of the seminar blogging. And I wonder why I never made partner.

Anyway, it’s an interesting area of the law, and one that can vary wildly from state-to-state, as our conversation in the comments yesterday about refusing the breath test revealed.  In Ohio you get scarlet letter license plates if you get a DUI. Fun times, even if they seem to be more gimmicky than anything else.

As for Cabrera, the guy makes $20 million a year. I hope he stops drinking completely because he obviously can’t handle it, but if he doesn’t, at least hire a driver, ya know?

The Mets expect Tim Tebow to come back next year

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Mets assistant general manager John Ricco told Newsday today that he expects minor league outfielder Tim Tebow to return for a third season in professional baseball.

Tebow, 31, broke the hamate bone in his right hand while swinging a bat in late July, ending his season. It was a fairly successful season for him all things considered. After being promoted to Double-A Binghamton to start the year he hit .273/.336/.399 with six home runs, a stolen base and a .734 OPS in 298 plate appearances and made the Double-A All-Star team. That’s not the stuff of a top prospect — he strikes out far too much and the power numbers aren’t fantastic given that power would figure to be his strongest tool — but it’s pretty respectable for a guy his age and with his relative lack of baseball experience. As I said back in July, you can believe the Mets’ interest in Tebow is more marketing than baseball, but that does not preclude you from giving the guy a deserved tip of the cap for working hard and sticking it out in the bush leagues.

Assuming he does come back, the Mets are likely to start him at Triple-A Syracuse in the hopes that he’d eventually get to the bigs as a late season callup if the Mets aren’t in contention. Indeed, many believed that was the plan for him this year had he not been injured.