Famous people are lining up to not own the Mets

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I guess it’s because it’s New York and everyone is bored, but there have been a plethora of reports — and calling them “reports” is actually an insult to the act of reporting — linking famous rich people and the Mets in the wake Wilpon’s announcement that he’s looking for minority owners.  There was the MLK III report. The de riguer Mark Cuban chatter. In recent days we’ve had people asking Mayor Bloomberg and Jerry Seinfeld to state their intentions.

Fun stuff, but we’re not likely to find the next Mets’ minority owner — or maybe majority owner — on the gossip pages.  The people with the kind of money to buy anything other than vanity stakes in major sports franchises are all beyond mere celebrity wealthy, and they’re not the type of people like Mayor Bloomberg — who is legitimately loaded — who live their lives publicly like this.  I mean, look around at baseball’s ownership ranks: most of these guys are people you never heard of before they became baseball owners.

I have some friends who work in finance and big business and they all have tales of big time movers with outrageous amounts of capital at their disposal, either personally or by virtue of being able to wrangle investors.  You haven’t heard of any of them.   Living out loud like big celebrities is anathema to the type of person who is able to conquer the business world. Or inherit their father’s conquests.  These types of people are only remarkable when they prove to be exceptions to this rule, such as the case of Mark Cuban.

The next owner of the Mets is gonna be someone familiar only to those who read every article in the Wall Street Journal.  That’s how big money — truly big money — operates.

Bradley Zimmer to miss 8-12 months after shoulder surgery

Cleveland Indians v Minnesota Twins
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Indians outfielder Bradley Zimmer is out for the year after undergoing arthroscopic surgery on his right shoulder, the team announced Saturday. The projected recovery timetable spans anywhere from 8-12 months, which puts Zimmer’s return in the second half of the 2019 season, assuming that all goes well.

Zimmer, 25, had not made an appearance for the Indians since June 3. He racked up a cumulative nine weeks on the major- and minor-league disabled lists this season and will have finished his year with a .226/.281/.330 batting line, seven extra-base hits, and four stolen bases in 114 plate appearances.

The outfielder reportedly sustained his season-ending injury during a workout in Triple-A Columbus, where Cleveland.com’s Joe Noga says Zimmer began feeling discomfort in his shoulder after completing a set of one-handed throwing drills. Comments from club manager Terry Francona suggest that the Indians have every reason to believe that he’ll make a full recovery by next summer, though it’s not yet clear whether or not he’ll need additional time to readjust to a full workload when he takes the field again.