The biggest difference between Wilpon and McCourt? Bud Selig likes Fred Wilpon more.

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Yesterday I talked about how baseball views the Wilpon and McCourt situations differently and about how, because of this, Bud Selig is likely to take a harder stance when it comes to McCourt’s proposed use of TV money vs. Wilpon’s use of SNY money.

Today Ken Rosenthal has his own compare and contrast on it, focusing less on the structure of it all and more on the fact that Bud Selig simply likes Fred Wilpon more than Frank McCourt.  After noting the sorts of things Selig could do to make McCourt’s life diffcult, Rosenthal reports:

Conversely, it is almost unthinkable that Selig would exert his influence to take an aggressive posture against Wilpon.

“He’s as close to Fred as he is to anybody in the game,” one former baseball executive says.

“(Selig) will do everything humanly possible to help the Wilpons,” another adds, referring to Fred and his son Jeff, the Mets’ chief operating officer. “He will bend himself into a pretzel to help them.”

The relationship is simply better with Wilpon than it is with McCourt.  And, as Rosenthal quotes multiple insiders saying, Bud is a relationships guy.

Good reading from Robo.  It catches the palace intrigue flavor of so much that animates the business of Major League Baseball.

MLB and MLBPA announce first set of COVID-19 test results

MLB COVID-19 test results
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images
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On Friday evening, Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association announced the first set of results for COVID-19 testing as part of the mandatory intake screening process under MLB’s COVID-19 Health Monitoring & Testing Plan. Per Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle, the Athletics are not part of this data because their testing has not yet been completed.

There were 38 positive tests, accounting for 1.2% of the 3,185 samples collected and tested. 31 of the 38 individuals who tested positive are players. 19 different teams had one or more individuals test positive.

Sports Illustrated’s Emma Baccellieri notes that the positive test rate in the U.S. nationally is 8.3 percent. The NBA’s positive test rate was 7.1 percent. MLB’s positive test rate is well below average. This doesn’t necessarily mean that anything is wrong with MLB’s testing or that it’s an atypical round of testing. Rather, MLB’s testing population may more closely represent the U.S. population as a whole. Currently, because testing is still somewhat limited, those who have taken tests have tended to be those exhibiting symptoms or those who have been around others who have tested positive. If every single person in the U.S. took a test, the positive test rate would likely come in at a much lower number.

Several players who tested positive have given their consent for their identities to be made known. Those are: Delino DeShields (link), Brett Martin (link), Edward Colina, Nick Gordon, and Willians Astudillo (link). Additionally, Red Sox lefty Eduardo Rodríguez has not shown up to Red Sox camp yet because he has been around someone who tested positive, per The Athletic’s Jen McCaffrey.