Sandy Alderson has totally revamped the Mets scouting system

4 Comments

In the Rotoworld Draft Guide — which you should totally buy now — I wrote an article ranking the top transactions of the offseason. I included the Mets hiring of Sandy Alderson in the top 10. It was the only non-player signing I mentioned. I mentioned it for good reason. Stuff like what the Daily News is reporting about how he has totally revamped the scouting department:

In contrast to Omar Minaya’s method of assigning pro scouts to a large number of major league teams (special assistant Bryan Lambe, for example, covered the entire National League last year), Alderson’s Mets will charge each pro scout with covering just three organizations, but far more comprehensively than before – from the low minor leagues to the major league club. J.P. Ricciardi will oversee their work.

“I don’t think there is a right way or a wrong way to do it, but this gives you a little more continuity,” Ricciardi said. “Getting guys on a system, from A-ball to Double-A to Triple-A, gives you a better understanding of what the organization is doing.”

I don’t believe for a second that anyone as famously, um, confident as J.P. Ricciardi believes that there isn’t a right way and a wrong way and that he isn’t now in charge of the right way.

And I can’t help but think that giving guys less breadth of responsibility but greater depth will help improve the Mets’ scouting operation.

Kenley Jansen expected to be OK for spring training after heart procedure

Kenley Jansen
Getty Images
Leave a comment

Building on a report from early September, Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen is slated to undergo a heart procedure on November 26. The estimated recovery time ranges from two to eight weeks, according to comments Jansen made Friday, and he expects to be able to rejoin the team once spring training rolls around next year.

Jansen, 31, was first diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat in 2011 and missed significant time during the 2011, 2012, and 2018 seasons due to the condition. He underwent his first surgery to correct the irregularity in 2012, but suffered recurring symptoms that could not be treated long-term with the heart medication and blood thinners that had been prescribed to him. Scarier still was the “atrial fibrillation episode” that the reliever experienced during a road trip to Colorado in August; per MLB.com’s Ken Gurnick, the high altitude exacerbated his heart condition and left him susceptible to future episodes in the event that he chose to return to the Rockies’ Coors Field.

Heart issues notwithstanding, the veteran right-hander pitched through his third straight All-Star season in 2018. Overall, he saw a downward trend in most of his stats, but still collected 38 saves in 59 opportunities and finished the season with a respectable 3.01 ERA, 2.1 BB/9 and 10.3 SO/9 through 71 2/3 innings. In October, he helped carry the Dodgers to their second consecutive pennant and wrapped up his sixth postseason run with three saves, two blown saves, and a 1.69 ERA across 10 2/3 innings.