Jarrod Saltalamacchia taps the yips away

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Interesting story by Gordon Edes about Jarrod Saltalamacchia’s struggles to get over the throwing yips that plagued him down in Texas.  The key: working with sports psychologists, including an expert on yips who has developed a unique system:

The system, he said, is modeled after the pressure points found in acupuncture. And athletes with the yips, he said, “are in so much pain.”

“Tapping helps clear out the negative emotion,” he said. “Say you struck out to end the seventh inning, and you still have to play defense and might come up to bat again. How to clear out that negative emotion?

“You focus on the negative. Start on your eyebrows. Focus on the negative. Each site, your eyes, below your nose, below your lip. The idea is to do a tap lap, go down and around, tap the top of your head, then start again. Tapping helps clear out the negative emotion.”

I tend to be skeptical of this sort of thing, but when it comes to hard-to-diagnose and even harder-to-fix problems like the yips, I’m firmly in the “whatever works” camp.   And as Edes reports, it seems to be working for Saltalamacchia.

I’m just cringing, though, at the thought of what some of the harsher Boston columnists, talk radio guys and fans are going to do with concepts like “energy psychology” and “negative emotion” if Saltalamacchia struggles early this season.

Watch: Cavan Biggio delivers his first MLB hit

Cavan Biggio
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Blue Jays top prospect Cavan Biggio made his MLB debut on Friday; by Sunday, he had his first pair of big-league hits, too. His first big moment arrived in the third inning of the team’s series finale against the Padres, when he chopped a Robbie Erlin fastball into right field for a single.

Biggio’s hit proved instrumental in getting the Blue Jays on the board. He advanced Lourdes Gurriel Jr. to third base and, in the next at-bat, Brandon Drury grounded into a force out to drive in the club’s first run of the afternoon.

In the fourth, Biggio went… well, bigger (sorry). He worked a 1-2 count against right-handed reliever Matt Wisler, then unloaded a towering 404-foot solo shot for his first MLB home run:

The 24-year-old second baseman is poised to make a big impact for the Blue Jays in 2019. The son of Hall of Fame infielder/outfielder Craig Biggio, Cavan ranked no. 9 among the organization’s prospects at the start of the season and slashed a promising .307/.445/.504 with six home runs, five stolen bases (in six attempts), and a .949 OPS through 173 PA at Triple-A Buffalo before getting the call to the Show this weekend. If Sunday’s performance is anything to go off of, it looks like the Blue Jays will be able to count on similar production levels from the rookie at the major-league level as well.

The Blue Jays currently lead the Padres 3-1 in the fifth.