Nick Swisher is a social media superstar. And that’s good news for all of us.

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There’s a story over at the Wall Street Journal today about how Nick Swisher has enhanced his personal brand, as they say, and is on track to be a bigtime product endorsement dude because of his social media cachet (i.e. he Twitters real good):

Mr. Swisher is a good player but is not on a Cooperstown track. As celebrity endorsements move beyond the superstars, the mid-level player with personality and social-media savvy can reach endorsement and name-recognition levels that were once only the domain of the best of the best, said David Carter, author of the recent book, Money Games, and head of the USC Sports Business Institute.

Good for Swisher, because he seems like a neat guy. And because we West Virginia-raised, Ohio State attendees have to stick together. But really, the best part of this is the inevitable side effects.

Swisher and most of the other athletes who are on Twitter a lot are there because they want to be there. They’re extroverts and over-sharers who naturally gravitate to the medium for the same reasons all of us other deadenders who spend our days glued to social media do. But now that it’s being talked up as a bonafide path to endorsement deals, you just know that agents and handlers are going to push their athlete-clients into getting on the Twitter more and more as a business proposition.

I can’t wait for that to happen. Because the Nick Swishers of the world know the rules and the etiquette of it all and are thus predictable and, it must be said, a tad boring.  In contrast, as those who might otherwise avoid social media are forced into it, there will be all kinds of social stumbles, scandals and embarrassment. And that’s exactly the kind of thing we Twitter deadenders absolutely live for.

Video: J.D. Martinez hits league-tying 23rd home run

Seattle Mariners v Boston Red Sox
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The Red Sox and Mariners left nothing on the table Friday night, going head-to-head in a series opener that eventually ended 14-10 in the Sox’ favor. Led by Steven Wright and Wade LeBlanc — neither of whom made it past the fifth inning — the teams combined for 34 hits and four home runs, including two moonshots from Seattle’s Nelson Cruz and a five-run rally that gave Boston the edge in the seventh.

In the sixth inning, however, the Red Sox were still scrambling to make up a four-run deficit. Left fielder J.D. Martinez cut it in half with one swing, pouncing on an 89.5-mph fastball from Seattle right-hander Nick Vincent and posting it to dead center field for a two-run shot.

The 427-foot blast was Martinez’s 23rd of the season, tying Mike Trout for the most home runs in the league this year. While he still has a ways to go before eclipsing the career-best 45-HR mark he set in 2017, he’s off to a strong start this season: Entering Friday’s game, the 30-year-old slugger was batting .315/.386/.623 with a 1.009 OPS and AL-leading 55 RBI in 308 PA. He finished Friday’s game 4-for-5 with five RBI, just one triple shy of hitting for the cycle.

Heading into the All-Star Break, both Martinez and Trout still have some competition for the home run title. Jose Ramirez is sitting at 22 homers, while Nelson Cruz and Khris Davis are tied at 20 apiece.