The Rotoworld Draft Guide is … Go!

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Yes, I’m shilling something here. But it’s a good something.  The Rotoworld Draft Guide drops today, and you really should consider buying it.

What is it?  Tons of analysis, projections, and profiles for over 1,000 players ranging down to A-ball.  Articles covering prospects, keeper-league strategies, mock drafts, sleepers and busts. There are customizable, printable cheat sheets, updated depth charts for all teams and all manner of other goodness.

And I even wrote some stuff in it.  Yes, I’m a fantasy baseball moron, but don’t worry: my stuff is not fantasy-related. It’s for the yuks.  Specifically, my 2011 “Year in Preview” in which I make hilarious predictions of what might come to pass this year, such as:

February: Given the addition of Cliff Lee to a rotation that already includes Roy Halladay, Cole Hamels and Roy Oswalt, Commissioner Selig decides to call off the rest of the season and award the Phillies the 2011 World Series trophy.  Phillies fans still complain, however, saying that they were “disrespected” by virtue of the fact that Selig did not have the words “and all of the rest of you are losers” engraved under the team’s name on the trophy.

August:  The pennant races really begin to heat up:

  • The Red Sox – powered by Carl Crawford and Adrian Gonzalez – hold a commanding 10-game lead over the Yankees.  Yankees fans complain about the Sox “buying a championship.”
  • The White Sox, Tigers and Twins are in a three-team dogfight for the AL Central.  The White Sox begin to fade, however, when team chemistry goes in the toilet after Ozzie Guillen’s son Oney buys a six-pack of Four Loko and decides to spend a quiet evening at home on Twitter telling everyone exactly what he thinks of the current White Sox roster.

And it just goes on and on like that.  I also have a rundown of the top 25 offseason moves, though that may actually be baseball writing rather than my usual snark-fest.

The real appeal, here, however, is for you fantasy players.  It’s chock full ‘o the kind of goodness you need to pwn your leagues.  Arron, Matthew, D.J., Drew and many others worked a metric-butt-ton of hours to put this bad boy together.  It’s great stuff.

Take it for a test drive here, and then order it.  You won’t be sorry.

MLB crowds jump from ’21, still below pre-pandemic levels

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PHOENIX — Even with the homer heroics of sluggers like Aaron Judge and Albert Pujols, Major League Baseball wasn’t able to coax fans to ballparks at pre-pandemic levels this season, though attendance did jump substantially from the COVID-19 affected campaign in 2021.

The 30 MLB teams drew nearly 64.6 million fans for the regular season that ended Wednesday, which is up from the 45.3 million who attended games in 2021, according to baseball-reference.com. This year’s numbers are still down from the 68.5 million who attended games in 2019, which was the last season that wasn’t affected by the pandemic.

The 111-win Los Angeles Dodgers led baseball with 3.86 million fans flocking to Dodger Stadium for an average of 47,672 per contest. The Oakland Athletics – who lost 102 games, play in an aging stadium and are the constant subject of relocation rumors – finished last, drawing just 787,902 fans for an average of less than 10,000 per game.

The St. Louis Cardinals finished second, drawing 3.32 million fans. They were followed by the Yankees (3.14 million), defending World Series champion Braves (3.13 million) and Padres (2.99 million).

The Toronto Blue Jays saw the biggest jump in attendance, rising from 805,901 fans to about 2.65 million. They were followed by the Cardinals, Yankees, Mariners, Dodgers, and Mets, which all drew more than a million fans more than in 2021.

The Rangers and Reds were the only teams to draw fewer fans than in 2021.

Only the Rangers started the 2021 season at full capacity and all 30 teams weren’t at 100% until July. No fans were allowed to attend regular season games in 2020.

MLB attendance had been declining slowly for years – even before the pandemic – after hitting its high mark of 79.4 million in 2007. This year’s 64.6 million fans is the fewest in a non-COVID-19 season since the sport expanded to 30 teams in 1998.

The lost attendance has been balanced in some ways by higher viewership on the sport’s MLB.TV streaming service. Viewers watched 11.5 billion minutes of content in 2022, which was a record high and up nearly 10% from 2021.