Chipper Jones is dealing with tendinitis in his surgically repaired left knee

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David O’Brien of the Atlanta Journal Constitution has an update on Chipper Jones, who “has been battling tendinitis in his surgically-repaired left knee.”

Jones downplayed the significance of the tendinitis, pointing out that he went through something similar following knee surgery in 1994 and calling it just “one of the steps along the way”  to recovery.

Now that you’re starting to get into the every day hustle bustle of getting yourself ready for spring training, you’ve got aches and pains. Tendinitis is just one of those steps you’ve got to get by. Ever since I’ve been in here every day getting treatment, I’ve had no limitations.

According to O’Brien, as part of that treatment Jones “wears a pad on his knee and cortisone, an anti-inflammatory, is electronically distributed through the skin.” He’s been taking batting practice regularly, but has yet to resume agility drills or take ground balls at third base since tearing his ACL on August 10.

He’s aiming to be ready for Opening Day, but the 39-year-old former MVP has quite a few hurdles to clear before then.

Reds, Raisel Iglesias agree to three-year contract

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The Reds announced on Wednesday that the club and pitcher Raisel Iglesias agreed to a three-year contract. Iglesias had been on a seven-year, $27 million contract signed in June 2014 and had two years with $10 million remaining. According to MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand, the new contract is worth $24.125 million, so it’s a hefty pay raise for Iglesias.

Iglesias, who turns 29 years old in January, has gotten better every season pitching out of the Reds’ bullpen. In 2018, he posted a 2.38 ERA with 30 saves and an 80/25 K/BB ratio in 72 innings. Over his four-year career, the right-hander has 64 saves with a 2.97 ERA and a 359/106 K/BB ratio in 321 2/3 innings.

Iglesias gets little fanfare pitching for the Reds, fifth-place finishers in each of his four years, but he is certainly among baseball’s better relievers. Signing him to a new three-year deal gives them some certainty at the back of the bullpen in the near future.

There was a bit of confusion regarding his previous contract, which allowed him to opt out and file for arbitration if eligible. Iglesias has three years and 154 days of service time, so his new contract essentially covers his arbitration-eligible years.