Wait people do actually think Cashman is trying to get himself fired?

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My “Brian Cashman is trying to get himself fired” comment from yesterday was meant as a joke. Not a good one — a bit too dry; I think I told it better on Twitter before repurposing it for the post — but I don’t honestly think that the man is trying to get canned.

My real issue was that because of the other stuff that has happened lately — and because of how easy it is to turn a couple of data points of oddness into some big b.s. trend — eventually someone was going to make that sort of connection.  Someone would list the random things like Cashman scaling down a building, losing out on Cliff Lee, hating the Rafael Soriano deal and all of that, and draw some distraction-inducing conclusion from it.

And someone did. Lupica, natch:

And there are people in baseball who wonder if Cashman has begun moving toward the door, if he really does want to go somewhere else and show the whole world that he is more a general manager than a money manager, that he doesn’t need to spend $200 million a year to build winning baseball teams.

Look at the wild, weird baseball winter Cashman has had already …

Then, as I suspected someone would, Lupica cites the highlights of Cashman’s winter, throws in extended recitation of that “Seinfeld” episode in which George tried to get fired by the Yankees and voila, Questions Have Been Raised.

And maybe it doesn’t matter because it’s just Lupica and that’s what he does. But a few days ago Brian Cashman said that dealing with the media garbage is the hardest part of his job.  I presume this is the stuff he’s talking about. How nothing can be taken at face value. It all has to mean something. I don’t blame him for chafing at it. I know it’s silly to base your moves off of what the media might do, but I did kind of wish that Cashman wasn’t fueling the haters’ fire.

I know this is going to sound silly coming from someone who posts 20 times a day about all manner of unimportant topics, but sometimes things don’t demand a grand unification theory.  Things just happen.  Maybe they’re worth a few sentences on a blog here and there, but a full-blown 750-word column lends itself to grander explanations.  Oftentimes ones that are purely illusionary.

Brian Dozier’s shot to center got stuck in the wall at Target Field

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You don’t see this every day …

Twins second baseman Brian Dozier hit a blast to dead-center field in the first inning of Wednesday afternoon’s game against the Tigers and it neither cleared the fence, nor banged off the fence, nor dropped in front of it.

Instead, the ball found a comfortable home inside the wall …

This isn’t the first wall-sticker for Dozier. He put a ball in the bullpen fence in Washington during an exhibition game against the Nationals back in 2016.