Could the Cardinals survive without Albert Pujols?

36 Comments

Jeff Gordon of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch thinks so:

The St. Louis Cardinals ranked among Major League Baseball’s most successful franchises before Albert Pujols arrived.

And the Cardinals will remain prosperous long after the Pujols Era finally ends, however it ends.

Baseball is bigger than one player around here. It always has been, it always will be – despite perceptions outside the market … The franchise has locked in other star players, like former batting champ Matt Holliday, former Cy Young Award winner Chris Carpenter and former World Series hero Adam Wainwright. Given their durable fan support, the Cards would be able to redistribute the money Albert rejects to other high-end players.

Life would go on.  St. Louis isn’t Cleveland. The Cardinals aren’t the Cavaliers. And Albert Pujols isn’t LeBron James.

On a very basic level he’s correct. But on a very basic level I would survive without Internet access, beer, television, books and steak.  If you reduce any question to “can we survive without it,” the only must-haves are food, water and shelter. And maybe Internet access.

The question facing John Mozeliak isn’t about the Cardinals’ survival. It’s about taking the best course given the options currently at their disposal. The costs and benefits of letting Pujols go versus the costs and benefits of keeping him.  And I don’t know how one can conclude that the Cardinals letting Pujols go would benefit the team. At all.  Maybe it would be different if the Cards were a struggling organization, but they are quite clearly not.

Albert Pujols is the best player in baseball. While the Cardinals have one of the richest histories in all of baseball, they have never lost a player of his caliber. They shouldn’t start testing the fanbase by doing so now.

 

Royals sign Drew Storen to minor league deal

Drew Storen
Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Royals are in agreement with right-handed reliever Drew Storen on a minor league deal, the team announced Friday. Per Jon Heyman of MLB Network, the deal is worth $1.25 million if the veteran righty breaks camp with the club this spring. Additional, albeit unspecified incentives will be included in the contract as well.

Storen, 31, is coming off of a protracted absence from any MLB duties. After inking a one-year deal with the Reds in 2017, he sustained a right elbow sprain toward the end of the year and underwent Tommy John surgery that October. He was effectively decommissioned for the club’s entire 2018 run and generated little interest around the league this winter, perhaps due in part to the uninspired 4.45 ERA, 3.8 BB/9, 7.9 SO/9, and career-low -0.2 fWAR he posted across 54 2/3 innings during his last healthy season.

While it’s not immediately clear what kind of performance the Royals can expect from Storen in spring training, they’re not exactly in a position to be choosy. Their bullpen ranked dead last among all MLB teams with a collective 5.04 ERA, 4.85 FIP, and -2.2 fWAR last year, and still appears to be in a state of flux as they approach Opening Day. Skipper Ned Yost told reporters Wednesday that he intends to eschew the traditional closer appointment in 2019 and will instead utilize a combination of right-handers Wily Peralta and Brad Boxberger, lefty Tim Hill, and various others as he tackles high-leverage situations in the future.