You’re wrong, Calcaterra: Mets fans most certainly do live and die with their team

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A couple of weeks ago I wrote this about Mets fans:

I don’t think there’s a fan base of its size in all of sports that has a more balanced take on things. Mets fans love ‘em when they win. When they don’t, well, they’re not gonna cry about it and make their lives miserable. Don’t get ‘em wrong — they’ll be there for the team through thick and thin — but you rarely find a Mets fans who lets his team’s misfortunes truly upset him any more than a few minutes after the game is over. Life goes on. There’s another game tomorrow.

What I should have said but neglected to was that I was basing this solely on my interaction with Mets fans here on the pages of HardballTalk, which is an obviously limited sample size.  Yesterday Matthew Callan of Amazin’ Avenue considered the quote and applied it to his experience of interacting with fellow Mets’ fans. An experience that I shall not hesitate to note is much, much broader than my own:

There’s no real answer to the question Calcaterra’s assessment poses, since it’s unfair to generalize any group as large and diverse as Mets fans. My own feeling is that he’s both wrong and right–wrong about the “living and dying” part, but right about Mets’ fans reasonableness and perspective (at least for the moment). What say you?

Before that closing comes a very well-considered post that does more to mine the psyche of Mets fans than I’m capable of doing.  His verdict: oh, yes, Mets fans do live and die with the team more than I presume.  I have to concede that he’d know better than I.  Go check it out.

Report: Orioles to name Brandon Hyde new manager

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Update (8:23 PM ET): MASN’s Roch Kubatko talked to new GM Mike Elias, who said there has been no offer made to Hyde for the position. Elias called the report “premature.”

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The Orioles are expected to name Cubs bench coach Brandon Hyde as the new manager, Joel Sherman of the New York Post reports. Nothing is official yet.

Hyde, 45, spent four seasons in the minors with the White Sox from 1997-2000, then played in the independent Western League in 2001 before calling it quits. He was a coach with the Marlins from 2010-12 and has been with the Cubs since 2013.

Other candidates for the Orioles’ open managerial position have included Pedro Grifol, Chip Hale, Mike Redmond, Mike Bell, and Manny Acta.

Hyde is taking over for Buck Showalter, who was at the helm of the Orioles from 2010-18. Last season, however, the Orioles finished 47-115, the worst record in team history. Hyde will be taking over a team that is rebuilding, so the expectations will be relatively low in his first couple of seasons.