You’re wrong, Calcaterra: Mets fans most certainly do live and die with their team

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A couple of weeks ago I wrote this about Mets fans:

I don’t think there’s a fan base of its size in all of sports that has a more balanced take on things. Mets fans love ‘em when they win. When they don’t, well, they’re not gonna cry about it and make their lives miserable. Don’t get ‘em wrong — they’ll be there for the team through thick and thin — but you rarely find a Mets fans who lets his team’s misfortunes truly upset him any more than a few minutes after the game is over. Life goes on. There’s another game tomorrow.

What I should have said but neglected to was that I was basing this solely on my interaction with Mets fans here on the pages of HardballTalk, which is an obviously limited sample size.  Yesterday Matthew Callan of Amazin’ Avenue considered the quote and applied it to his experience of interacting with fellow Mets’ fans. An experience that I shall not hesitate to note is much, much broader than my own:

There’s no real answer to the question Calcaterra’s assessment poses, since it’s unfair to generalize any group as large and diverse as Mets fans. My own feeling is that he’s both wrong and right–wrong about the “living and dying” part, but right about Mets’ fans reasonableness and perspective (at least for the moment). What say you?

Before that closing comes a very well-considered post that does more to mine the psyche of Mets fans than I’m capable of doing.  His verdict: oh, yes, Mets fans do live and die with the team more than I presume.  I have to concede that he’d know better than I.  Go check it out.

Royals fire manager Mike Matheny after 65-97 end to season

Minnesota Twis v Kansas City Royals
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KANSAS CITY, Mo. – Manager Mike Matheny and pitching coach Cal Eldred were fired by the Kansas Cty Royals on Wednesday night, shortly after the struggling franchise finished the season 65-97 with a listless 9-2 loss to the Cleveland Guardians.

The Royals had exercised their option on Matheny’s contract for 2023 during spring training, when the club hoped it was turning the corner from also-ran to contender again. But plagued by poor pitching, struggles from young position players and failed experiments with veterans, the Royals were largely out of playoff contention by the middle of summer.

The disappointing product led owner John Sherman last month to fire longtime front office executive Dayton Moore, the architect of back-to-back American League champions and the 2015 World Series title team. Moore was replaced by one of his longtime understudies, J.J. Picollo, who made the decision to fire Matheny hours after the season ended.

Matheny became the fifth big league manager to be fired this year.

Philadelphia’s Joe Girardi was replaced on June 3 by Rob Thomson, who engineered a miraculous turnaround to get the Phillies into the playoffs as a wild-card team. The Angels replaced Joe Maddon with Phil Nevin four days later, Toronto’s Charlie Montoyo was succeeded by John Schneider on July 13 and the Rangers’ Chris Woodward by Tony Beasley on Aug. 15.

In addition, Miami’s Don Mattingly said late last month that he will not return next season.