Would Brian Cashman rather run a small market team?

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Over the weekend, Bill Madden of the Daily News wrote a column about the Brian Cashman/Rafael Soriano press conference.  The premise: Brian Cashman is chafing at what it means to be the general manager of the New York Yankees:

If you listen to some of things Cashman has said over the years and look at the pattern with which he has chosen to operate in the last few years – the CC Sabathia, A.J. Burnett, Mark Teixeira winter notwithstanding – a picture emerges of a GM who clearly wishes he was running a small-market team like his pal Billy Beane in Oakland. Indeed, you get the feeling that Cashman is tired of being labled a “checkbook GM”, while viewing that $200 million Yankee payroll as an albatross rather than a built-in insurance policy for making the postseason every year.

I suppose there are any number of ways to read this — Brien at IIATMS, where I saw the column linked, has a pretty robust takedown of it all here — but I tend to revert to Occam’s Razor whenever possible.

A simpler explanation than Cashman wanting to prove his brains to the world by running a team with a relative handicap is that Cashman would simply prefer to run the Yankees without being overruled by anyone and that he got a bit miffed when he wasn’t allowed to.  Doesn’t mean he wants to leave. Doesn’t mean he wants to prove himself by turning the Pirates into a winner or something. Like all of us, he just wants to do the job he currently has in a manner that makes him happy.

Cashman’s reaction to the Soriano business is a human one, and unless we hear of more palace intrigue from Yankeeland, I’m inclined to believe that this is simply a matter of a guy venting a bit as opposed to some crisis of confidence like the one Madden describes.

Cardinals shut down Carlos Martínez for two weeks due to shoulder issue

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MLB.com’s Jenifer Langosh reports that the Cardinals are shutting down pitcher Carlos Martínez from throwing for two weeks because his shoulder strength isn’t where it should have been at this point. Langosch added that an MRI showed no structural damage in Martínez’s right shoulder.

Interestingly, president of baseball operations John Mozeliak didn’t sound too happy with Martínez offseason training regimen. Per Mark Saxon of The Athletic, Mozeliak said, “Obviously, there’s a history with Carlos’ shoulder and it would be probably in everybody’s best interest if he maintained a constant or perpetual approach to that program.”

Martínez, 27, battled oblique and shoulder injuries last year. He accrued just 118 2/3 innings, making just 18 starts. He was moved to the bullpen when he returned from the disabled list in August and finished out the season in that role. Still, Martínez managed a 3.11 ERA with 117 strikeouts and 60 walks.

Langosch reported last week that the Cardinals were considering using Martínez in relief again in 2019. The latest news may push the Cardinals to indeed use Martínez out of the bullpen once again. He will be reevaluated in early March, but there is a chance he won’t be ready for Opening Day.