Potential buyers for the Dodgers emerge

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Frank McCourt’s official line is that the Dodgers are not for sale. But whether they’re ultimately sold is kind of out of his hands. If the latest court ruling is upheld, Jamie McCourt is going to be owed a ton of money for her share of the team, Frank doesn’t have it handy, and the only way for him to get it would be to sell the Dodgers.

Against that backdrop, BusinessWeek reports that a couple of people are indicating that they’d be interested: private equity dude Alec Gores and real estate mogul Alan Casden.*

I don’t read much business press so I’ve never heard of either of them. But that’s what Google is for. Here’s a recent writeup on Gores:

Sometimes spotted courtside at Lakers games with pal Sylvester Stallone, Gores is looking to enter the movie industry. Bidding in partnership with billionaire brother Tom for Walt Disney’s Miramax film division against financial heavyweights including Ron Burkle and Ron Tutor.

Kind of sounds like a baseball owner. Likes sports. Likes media. Does business with his family. Hangs out with weird celebrities. I also heard that Ron Burkle was interested in buying the Pirates once upon a time, so maybe Gores want the Dodgers as a way to figuratively flip the bird at a business rival! Oh, and Gores was raised in Flint, Michigan. I was in part, so I’m going to make him my favorite for no other reason than that.

As for Casden:

Taciturn and tenacious Casden won approval in February for West Hollywood mixed-use development that could be worth more than $300 million when completed. Another mixed-use development next to planned West L.A. light-rail station could be worth upwards of $750 million, if built.

Mixed-use development guy? Hey, that also sounds like a baseball owner!  Ever been to Dodger Stadium? Seen how big that parking lot is?  It could easily fit a Home Depot and a couple of condos! And if he’s into the light rail scene, maybe Dodger Stadium will finally get some friggin’ mass transit.  It’s brutal getting in and out of there.

Eh, rich people. I don’t really pretend that I understand them, so I’m just snarking here. I just hope that when they take over baseball teams they do the right thing and plow an insane amount of money into players, try to keep a lid on beer prices, make sure the team’s announcers aren’t awful and at least pretend to be happy when the team wins.

*Mark Cuban is given quick lip service too, but it’s based on old, old news. And frankly, I’m kind of bored talking about Cuban.

Starters? Openers? Who cares? It’s the lack of offense killing the Brewers

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The talk of Game 5 of the NLCS — and, indeed, the talk of the postseason so far — has been the Brewers’ creative use of their pitching staff. Indeed, Craig Counsell calling for Brandon Woodruff, and removing Miley from the game after just one batter and five pitches, stands as one of the more audacious acts of bullpenning in recent memory.

In light of that strategy, it was tempting to compare and contrast the Brewers’ approach to that of the Dodgers. Clayton Kershaw gave up an early run and, as has so often been the case lately, didn’t look super sharp early. But as the game wore on he got stronger, his curve got more devastating and he turned in an ace-like performance, leaving after seven innings of work, retiring the final 13 batters he faced. The Brewers may have an army of pitchers they throw at you, but the Dodgers, on this night, had a Hulk.

That’s all a lot of fun, and it was a tempting narrative to grab a hold of, but you know what? It doesn’t matter a bit. The fact of the matter is that the Brewers have scored two runs in the last 17 innings between Games 4 and 5. Two runs, with one of them being an oh-by-the-way run with out in the ninth tonight. They’ve only scored three runs in their last 24 innings. They could have a college of coaches using a murder of pitchers and they’d still be staring at being down 3-2 like they are right now because the bats have gone cold.

The presumptive NL MVP, Christian Yelich, was 0-for-4 in Game 5 and is only 3-for-20 with three singles in the entire NLCS. Ryan Braun is 5-for-21. Lorenzo Cain is 6-for-24. Games 3 and 4 have, obviously, been the big problems for the Brewers. In those games the entire team is batting .168 with 26 strikeouts and they are 3-for-13 with runners in scoring position.

Craig Counsell could go back in time, bring back Pete Vukovich, Rollie Fingers, Teddy Higuera, Moose Haas and Jim Slaton, use them all for an inning and two-thirds each and it wouldn’t matter if the Brewers can’t score. That’s the story of the series so far. No matter how much we might want to talk about the pitching shenanigans, that’s the only thing that really matters.