More trouble for the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum

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We wrote back in October about the challenges facing the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum. Joe Posnanski said that the place was in “grave danger.”  Dr. Raymond Doswell, the museum’s interim director, wrote to me to tell me that Posnanski was overstating the problems.  Dr. Doswell will likely have to write to Sam Mellinger now too, because Sam is sounding the alarm over the Museum scratching its annual Legacy Awards show, which is the biggest event on its agenda each year:

Every January for the last decade, the museum has shined. The Legacy Awards Show became its best-known event. Now, for the first time since 2000, nothing, no event, and what’s worse is that some longtime museum members are just now finding out …

The show should’ve been this weekend. Men and women should be dressing to the nines, black ties and long dresses and open checkbooks. Baseball stars like Albert Pujols and Josh Hamilton would’ve been invited, and the ones who showed up would’ve smiled and told a room full of potential donors how much the museum’s legacy means to them.

All that, now gone.

Mellinger says that there’s talk about rescheduling the Legacy Awards Show for November to coincide with Buck O’Neil’s 100th birthday. I’ve had my fair share of dealings with non-profits, fundraising and the like, however, and these kinds of moves are almost always harbingers of doom.  Here’s hoping this case provides an exception.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.