Adrian Gonzalez working hard at rehabbing his shoulder. At Petco Park.

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Buster Olney has a good column up today about Adrian Gonzalez’s focus and hard work as he rehabs his shoulder this winter and prepares for the big expectations facing him in Boston this season.  But this stuck out at me:

Gonzalez, a left-handed hitter who throws with his left hand, hurt his right shoulder last year, and he could have tried to go into the 2011 season without surgery. But he hated how the injury restricted what he could do on defense last season, how it prevented him from diving for balls to his right. So he had the surgery after the season, and three days a week this offseason, he has been going to Petco Park to work with Rick Stauffer, the team’s physical therapist, and trainer Todd Hutcheson.

Shortly after Gonzalez was traded — a move that was viewed as inevitable within the Padres’ organization — Gonzalez arrived at Petco Park for his next rehab session, and there was some talk about the deal. But not much. Stauffer just went about his work with Gonzalez, driving his thumbs into the right shoulder to manipulate the tissue, stretching, strengthening.

Do players who get traded typically still use their old team’s trainers and facilities?  I mean, yes, the Padres were his team when he had the surgery so it makes sense that they’d oversee his rehab too. And of course, Gonzalez lives in San Diego.  But it seems strange to me that the Padres would use their resources on another team’s player and that another team would leave their starting first baseman’s rehab to another team.

Not criticizing the move necessarily — it seems pretty efficient, actually, and I imagine that if it were unusual Olney would make some mention of it — but I was rather surprised by it.

Video: Rhys Hoskins gets revenge against Jacob Rhame with homer, slooooow trot

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Wednesday night’s Phillies-Mets game did not feature any beanballs or benches-clearing brawls, but it did feature Rhys Hoskins getting his revenge against Jacob Rhame. Last night, Rhame threw a fastball up-and-in at Hoskins. Rhame maintained his innocence, though Hoskins was skeptical.

Hoskins got a chance for revenge against Rhame in the ninth inning with the Phillies already ahead 4-0. Bryce Harper drew a leadoff walk. Hoskins then worked a 1-1 count before drilling a 95 MPH fastball over the left field fence for a two-run home run. Hoskins milked his accomplishment, taking a 34-second stroll around the bases. For a point of comparison, MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo notes that noted speedster Bartolo Colón had a 30.5-second trot around the bases after homering in 2016. MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki notes that Hoskins’ longest home run trot prior to this was clocked at 28.88 seconds. Wednesday’s trot was the first this season above 30 seconds across the league.

The dinger is Hoskins’ seventh of the season. He also walked and tripled in Wednesday’s 6-0 win. On the season, Hoskins is now batting .273/.402/.580 with 20 RBI and 18 runs scored in 107 plate appearances.