The Mariners decline to name a permanent replacement for Dave Niehaus. Good for them.

6 Comments

A couple of weeks ago it was reported that the Mariners were considering forgoing naming a permanent replacement for the late Dave Niehaus in favor of using a revolving cast of part-time broadcasters to fill the void. Today they announced that they’ll do exactly that:

Randy Adamack, the Mariners’ vice president of communications, confirmed Wednesday that the club will employ at least five announcers with prior experience in the booth on a rotating basis to work primarily with Rick Rizzs on radio broadcasts for the upcoming season.

Rizzs, who worked alongside Niehaus for 25 years, will be the main play-by-play man on radio. His partners will be Ron Fairly, Ken Levine, Ken Wilson, Dave Valle and Dan Wilson, with more names possibly being added to that list, Adamack said.

This is the right move. Like I said before, whoever comes in, no matter how good a job they do, is going to be judged harshly compared to Niehaus. Anyone would.  The bond between fans and a good everyday broadcaster is stronger than some might think.  Give everyone some time.

MLB calls umpire union statement about Manny Machado discipline “inappropriate”

Getty Images
7 Comments

Earlier today the Major League Baseball Umpire’s Association made multiple posts on social media registering its displeasure at what it feels was the league’s weak discipline of Manny Machado following his run-in with umpire Bill Welke. It was an unusual statement, as it’s not common for umpires, individual or via their union to comment on such matters.

This evening, in an official statement, the league called it inappropriate:

“Manny Machado was suspended by MLB Chief Baseball Officer Joe Torre, who considered all the facts and circumstances of Machado’s conduct, including precedent, in determining the appropriate level of discipline.  Mr. Machado is appealing his suspension and we do not believe it is appropriate for the union representing Major League Umpires to comment on the discipline of players represented by the Players Association, just as it would not be appropriate for the Players Association to comment on disciplinary decisions made with respect to umpires.  We also believe it is inappropriate to compare this incident to the extraordinarily serious issue of workplace violence.”

That final bit, about workplace violence, is something that I didn’t really consider when I read the umps’ statements, but it’s a damn good point. In an age where people are literally shooting up workplaces, umpires making reference to that kind of thing in response to a player throwing a bat is pretty rich indeed. And in pretty poor taste.