So apparently Hall of Fame voters have a “sacred responsibility” to keep the place “clean and pure”

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Jim Reeves of ESPN Dallas would like to let you know how important his Hall of Fame vote is:

Judge and jury? Moral compasses? Gatekeepers? Yeah, maybe so, because that’s the responsibility we accept when we qualify to become a Hall of Fame voter. Because of the steroids issue, it’s a responsibility that has become so charged with controversy, I have even considered rejecting that honor and asking that my name be taken off the rolls as an active voter. It was a difficult and often agonizing challenge before the steroids era descended upon us. You can only imagine what it’s like now.

But I haven’t quit as a voter—not yet, anyway—because I consider it a sacred responsibility to the great players of the past to keep their exclusive club as clean and pure as possible. And yes, I say that with full knowledge that there are already a few in there with questionable credentials and backgrounds. All I can do is the best that I can. I owe that to late greats such as Joe DiMaggio and Lou Gehrig, Eddie Matthews and Roberto Clemente. I owe it to Nolan Ryan and Fergie Jenkins, to Alomar and Blyleven.

That would be the same Fergie Jenkins who got busted for trying to get cocaine, hashish, and marijuana through Canadian customs in 1980, so like, whatever.

I guess I’d rather have someone with a Hall of Fame vote err on the side of taking it a bit too seriously than to believe that it’s a joke or a goof. But come on. “Sacred responsibility?” “Clean and pure?” You know that you’re dealing with mission creep of the first order when that kind of rhetoric is being tossed around about baseball.

Max Scherzer, with broken nose, strikes out 10 Phillies over seven shutout innings

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Nationals starter Max Scherzer bunted a ball into his face during batting practice on Tuesday, breaking his nose in the process. He ended up with a gnarly looking shiner around his right eye, making him appear a bit like Terminator. Scherzer still took the ball to start the second game of Wednesday night’s doubleheader against the Phillies.

Despite the injury, Scherzer was incredibly effective, limiting the Phillies to four hits and two walks across seven shutout innings, striking out 10 batters in the process. He might even have had some extra adrenaline going, as he averaged 96.2 MPH on his fastball, his highest average fastball velocity in a game since September 2012, per MLB.com’s Jamal Collier. The Nationals provided Scherzer with just one run of support, coming on a Brian Dozier solo home run off of Jake Arrieta in the second inning, but it was enough.

Wander Suero worked a scoreless top of the eighth with a pair of strikeouts. Victor Robles added a solo homer off of Pat Neshek in the bottom half. Closer Sean Doolittle took over in the ninth, working a 1-2-3 frame to give the Nats their 2-0 victory.

Over his last six starts, Scherzer now has a 0.88 ERA with a 59/8 K/BB ratio across 41 innings. He has gone six innings, struck out at least nine batters, and held the opposition to two or fewer runs in each of those six starts.