Conlin: lose the Hall of Fame morals clause

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I’m often dismissed as an extremist-nutjob when it comes to PEDs and the Hall of Fame, but Bill Conlin just won the Hall of Fame’s J.G. Taylor Spink Award and will be honored at the induction ceremonies in Cooperstown next summer for cryin’ out loud. Maybe someone will listen to him:

I am increasingly uncomfortable determining who is in and who is out of the HOF based on a process in which an increasingly undefinable moral code is the compass in the absence of evidence … It is past time for the people who make the Hall of Fame eligibility rules to lose the morals clause, or at least the “integrity, sportsmanship, character” wording … Just let us vote the HOF ballot without the impediment of a moral code guiding a flawed process in which big-league players can’t even be tested for HGH, where all those Barry Bonds-sized heads and jacked-up strength and reflexes come from.  Most of us know a great ballplayer when we see one. Let us decide without a morals clause whether the guy cheated to become one.

I think Bill and I would vote very differently for the Hall of Fame. And there’s nothing wrong with that. Because in this we would be disagreeing on the merit of candidates as baseball players, not moral actors, and that would improve the process considerably.

Mariners lose on walk-off wild pitch

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2019 has not been kind to the Seattle Mariners. After starting the year 13-2, the club has gone 41-71 since, earning last place in the AL West. To give credit where credit is due, however, the Mariners were on something of a roll, entering Wednesday afternoon’s series road trip finale against the Rays on a four-game winning streak. However, the M’s lost Wednesday’s contest in very depressing fashion.

Entering the top of the ninth inning, the Mariners trailed the Rays 5-3, but a solo homer by Daniel Vogelbach and a two-run triple by Mallex Smith sent them into the bottom half of the ninth leading 6-5. Manager Scott Servais sent Matt Magill — acquired from the Twins exactly one month ago — to the mound to close out the game.

Kevin Kiermaier greeted Magill rudely, starting the inning by swatting a game-tying solo home run to center field. Magill would then allow a single to Willy Adames and a double to Michael Brosseau before intentionally walking Ji-Man Choi to load the bases with no outs. Tommy Pham worked the count to 1-2 when Magill spiked a breaking ball in the dirt that catcher Omar Narváez had little hope of corralling. The ball skipped away and the Rays walked off 7-6 winners on a wild pitch, a very on-brand sentence for the 2019 Mariners.