Don Cooper doesn’t want the White Sox to mess with Chris Sale

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The White Sox just officially announced a two-year, $4 million contract with left-handed reliever Will Ohman.

When the agreement was initially reported on Saturday, many immediately speculated (including myself) that his addition to the bullpen would push Matt Thornton to the closer role and Chris Sale to the rotation if Jake Peavy isn’t ready for the start of the season after shoulder surgery.

Well, White Sox pitching coach Don Cooper reiterated to Doug Padilla of ESPN Chicago over the weekend that he isn’t into that idea.

“I’m not favor of that,” Cooper said, when asked if Sale would be used as a starter until an injured Jake Peavy returned. “It’s unfair and too much to ask of a young guy until he has a chance to get himself situated.”

“If he starts, he starts and starts all year. To start for a month, I don’t like the sound or the feel of that. But I’m speaking for myself only. I haven’t talked to [manager] Ozzie [Guillen] or [general manager] Kenny [Williams] on any of this.”

Sale, who was selected 13th overall last June, made his major league debut last August and posted a 1.93 ERA and 32/10 K/BB ratio over 23 1/3 innings down the stretch. Though the White Sox used him exclusively in relief, the 21-year-old southpaw was drafted as a starting pitcher out of Florida Gulf Cost University. However, with Edwin Jackson, Mark Buehrle, Gavin Floyd, John Danks and a healthy Peavy, it’s unlikely Sale will be a full-time starter for the club, at least in 2011.

While Cooper is still optimistic that Peavy will be ready for the start of the season, he named Tony Pena, Charlie Leesman and Lucas Harrell as some potential short-term alternatives for the final spot in the rotation.

Troy Tulowitzki held a workout for eleven clubs

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Yesterday free agent shortstop Troy Tulowitzki held a workout in California and representatives from at least eleven teams were on hand, reports Tim Brown of Yahoo. Among the clubs present: the Giants — who were said to have a “heavy presence,” including team president Farhan Zaidi and manager Bruce Bochy — the Angels, Red Sox, Cubs, Padres, White Sox, Orioles, Yankees, Phillies, Tigers and Pirates.

Your first reaction to that may be “Um, really? For Tulowitzki?” But a moment’s reflection makes it seem more sensible. We’re so tied up in thinking of a player through the filter of their contract and, when we’ve done that with Tulowitzki over the past several years, it has made him seem like an albatross given the $20 million+ a year he was earning to either not play or play rather poorly due to injuries.

It was just the contract that was the albatross, though, right? An almost free Tulowitzki — which he will be given that the Blue Jays are paying him $38 million over the next two seasons — is a different matter. If you sign him it’ll be for almost no real money and he stands a chance to be an average or maybe better-than-average shortstop, which is pretty darn valuable. You might even get one quirky late career return-to-near-glory season from him, in which case you’ve hit the lottery. If, however, as seems more likely, he just can’t get it done at all, you’re not out anything and you can cut him with little or no pain.

Eleven teams think he’s at least a look-see. I bet one of them will offer him a major league deal. Maybe more than one. He’ll probably have his pick of non-roster invites to spring training. I can’t see the downside to at least doing that much.