Dallas Green’s granddaughter killed in Tucson shooting

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The tragic shooting spree Saturday at a political rally in Tucson, Arizona has an unfortunate baseball tie.

Christina Taylor Greene, the 9-year-old child who was killed, is the granddaughter of ex-MLB manager Dallas Green and the daughter of current Dodgers scout John Green.  This from Adam Rubin of ESPN New York.

The elder Green managed the Phillies from 1979-1981, winning a World Series title in 1980.  He went on to skipper the Yankees for parts of the 1989 season and then took over for the Mets from 1993-1996.

Christina Taylor was one of six people left dead when 22-year-old Jared Lee Loughner opened fire at a political meet-and-greet outside of a grocery store.  13 others were wounded, including Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, who is in critical condition at a local Tucson hospital.

Christina Taylor was born on September 11, 2001 and developed a strong interest in politics at a young age.  She was attending the rally with her neighbor to get a closer look at political life and to meet Congresswoman Giffords.

Thoughts and prayers go out to the Green family and all of those affected.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.