What they’re saying about the Hall of Fame vote

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And with the exception of the first one, I’m steering clear of the obvious “hooray for Bert and Roberto” stuff, because I think that goes without saying:

Rich Lederer: “BERT BLYLEVEN IS A HALL OF FAMER!”

Rob Neyer: “when two deserving Hall of Famers like Blyleven and Alomar are elected, it’s easy to forgive the voters for missing on Jeff Bagwell, Barry Larkin, Alan Trammell, and Tim Raines. If nobody is elected next year, forgiving will be very difficult.”

Joe Posnanski: “If the Hall of Fame voters feel like they should punish McGwire for admitting he used steroids — even if he was evasive about the effects — then it seems to me that we are discouraging anyone from coming clean. It’s almost like the voters don’t really want to know the truth. Maybe we would rather think the worst.”

Nate Silver: “If you’re not willing to reserve a place for players who meet or exceed the statistical standards of the average Hall of Famers at their positions, however — players like a Larkin or a Bagwell — the discussion really ought to turn to which players we need to kick out. No Barry Larkin? No Travis Jackson. No Tim Raines? No Max Carey. No Jeff Bagwell? No High Pockets Kelly. No Trammell and Whitaker? That’s fine: let’s boot Tinker and Evers.”

Tim Marchman: “The waiting is finally over for Kevin Brown. Garnering 77% of the vote on his first try today, he is the newest member of the Baseball Hall of Fame.”  [note: you probably need to read the whole thing to get what Tim is driving at].

Nick Cafardo: “You have to wonder whether Rice, Dawson, and Blyleven would have been elected if the Steroid Era never happened. That it took so long for Blyleven raises red flags, as it did with Rice and Dawson.”

Ted Berg: “None of Bonds, Clemens, Piazza and Bagwell were ever punished by Major League Baseball for doing whatever they did, if they did anything. It’s ridiculous to try to punish them now. The Hall of Fame should just eliminate the character clause from the voting criteria and focus on honoring the best players.”

Danny Knobler:  “Bert Blyleven is what’s great about the Hall of Fame. I say that even though he got in without ever getting my vote. In fact, I say that in part because he got in without my vote.”

Joe Lemire: “While some mock the concept that a player can grow more or less worthy of induction with each passing year — after all, everyone up for election has been retired for at least five years and so Blyleven hasn’t added to his 287 career wins since 1992 — new research and insight can shape how a player’s career is considered … Blyleven’s longevity — both in the macro sense of his 22-year career and the micro sense of his 242 complete games — is increasingly absent in today’s game, so with each year on the ballot appreciation grew for what he accomplished in the sport.”

I’m sure a lot more reactions will trickle in today. We’ll highlight the good ones, the bad ones and the simply perplexing ones as we see them.

Blue Jays designate Edwin Jackson for assignment

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Back in May journeyman Edwin Jackson debuted with the Toronto Blue Jays. When he did so, he made history by suiting up for a record 14th different team in his 17-year big league career.

Sadly the 14th time wasn’t the charm, as Jackson has been knocked around pretty good with Toronto, posting an 11.12 ERA in 28 and a third innings over eight appearances, five of which came as starts. He was just insanely hittable over that span, allowing a staggering 15.6 hits per nine innings. As such, it’s not too surprising that the Jays designated Jackson for assignment today. They did so to make room for Jacob Waguespack, who will start tonight’s game against the Red Sox.

Jackson, 35, will not try to latch on with team number 15. Or, I suppose, he he has almost even odds to re-join an old team.