The Mariners may not formally replace Dave Niehaus any time soon

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How do you replace a broadcasting legend?  As Larry LaRue reports, the Seattle Mariners may just avoid a replacement for the late great Dave Niehaus altogether:

Out of respect for Niehaus, his family and fans, the team has not conducted a single interview – and may not. Among the options the Mariners are considering is having only familiar faces and voices on their television and radio broadcasts next season, filling the airwaves with the presence of former players and broadcasters.

“That’s something we’ve talked about,” team vice president of communications Randy Admack said. “There’s a line of thought that we could make 2011 a transitional season for our fans.”

Not a bad idea.  Eventually you need a permanent replacement, but there’s nothing wrong with giving the fans and Niehaus’ colleagues a season to reflect and adjust to their unfortunate new reality.  Anyone who comes in, no matter how good a job they do, is going to be judged harshly and will fail to live up to what the fans want. Because, understandably, they want the impossible: they want Dave Niehaus back.

(thanks to Evan for the heads up)

Brewers promote David Stearns from GM to president of baseball operations

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It used to be that the top dog in a team’s baseball operations department was the general manager. That has changed over the past several years with some combination of title inflation, a genuine addition of supervisory layers and, on some level, employe poaching insurance leading to the top dog now being called, usually, a “president of baseball operations.”

Brewers’ general manager David Stearns is the latest to assume that tile, as the club just announced that he has been promoted to Milwaukee’s president of baseball operations. He has also received a contract extension of unknown length.

Not a big shock given how well the Brewers did in 2018, winning the NL Central title and playing in the NLCS. It’s also worth noting — with a nod to that “employee poaching insurance” item above — that Stearns has drawn some interest from other organizations. It’s thus not unfair to see the promotion is both a thanks for a job well done and a means of keeping other teams’ hands off of him, as employees are generally not given permission to interview for lateral moves, but are given permission to interview for promotions.

The Mudville Nine may have wanted to steal him from Milwaukee, but for Stearns to get a promotion from where he is now would require the creation of some other lofty title.