The Mets are testing some grand business management theories or something

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I don’t like the Mets very much, but I really hate business books. As such, this article in today’s Wall Street Journal about how a book analyzing what happens to businesses who collect brains rather than promote from within relates to the Mets was a bit of a slog.  Some of you may like it though:

… “stars” who moved to new organizations in teams or “packs” performed better than those who moved individually, for their relationships with each other made it easier to replicate the conditions that had made them successful in the first place. Dr. Groysberg called such connections “relationship human capital.” And for Mr. DePodesta, 38, who regards “Moneyball” as a treatise not on how to evaluate athletic talent but on how to exploit “stagnant systems,” “Chasing Stars” represents another opportunity to test business theories and principles in what might at first seem an unorthodox setting.

I know I’m supposed to be all forward-thinking and sabermetrically-friendly, but after reading this article, I’d like nothing more than to hear about a team who hired a crusty old GM who eats pastrami sandwiches and says stuff like “we need some fellas who can really hit the snot out of the ball, see?”