Joe Posnanski is going Hall of Fame crazy this week

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If you’ve grown weary of all of the Hall of Fame posts I’ve been writing over the past couple of weeks you may not want to read Joe Posnanski this week. He’s doing a lengthy Hall of Fame post each day, starting with today’s introductory post in which he talks about his Hall of Fame philosophy.  Tomorrow he’ll write about his “easy nos,” on Wednesday will be his close calls, on Thursday his stone-cold-locks and on Friday he’ll have the ones who really drove him nuts to leave off his ballot.

The key takeaway from today: despite people going on about letting every Tom, Dick and Harry into the hall these days, the electorate has gotten way, way tougher over the past couple of decades than it used to be. He takes a look at the number of players who got 5,000 plate appearances in their career and counts the Hall of Famers by decade:

The stunning takeaway is that half of the sturdy everyday players who retired sometime in the 1930s are in the Hall of Fame. This, of course, is absolutely ridiculous. If you raise the bar to 8,000 plate appearances, an almost unbelievable 17 out of 20 are in the Hall of Fame. In the 1980s, only 10 out of the 40 players who retired with 8,000 or more plate appearances are in the Hall, and this leaves out some very good players who will likely never get any more consideration for the Hall of Fame, players like Ted Simmons, Dave Concepcion, Graig Nettles, Bobby Grich and, of course, Pete Rose.

And in the 90s, if the steroid hysterics carry the day, it will be even less.  Makes me wonder if, in an effort to keep the Hall of Fame “pure,” today’s electorate is really killing the damn place.

Odubel Herrera’s on-base streak ends at 45 games

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Phillies outfielder Odubel Herrera‘s streak of reaching base safely has ended after 45 consecutive games. He went 0-for-4 with three strikeouts in Sunday’s 5-1 loss to the Cardinals.

Herrera’s streak tied Chuck Klein for the fourth-longest on-base streak in Phillies history. The only longer streaks were done by Mike Schmidt (56), Klein again (49), and Bobby Abreu (48). It’s the longest on-base streak in the majors since Freddie Freeman reached base in 46 consecutive games from August 6 to September 28, 2016. Jayson Werth also got to 46 in a row June 20 through August 18 that same year.

After Sunday’s 0-fer, Herrera is batting .344/.411/.544 with seven home runs, 30 RBI, and 24 runs scored in 180 plate appearances. He leads the National League in batting average, and ranks sixth and ninth in slugging percentage.