The Giants are locking up Krukow and Kuiper for six more years

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I never had a chance to listen Mike Krukow and Duane Kuiper doing Giants games until this year when I began surfing between multiple games each night for a living.  But having had a chance to check them out in 2010, I agree: they’re near the top of the heap as far as broadcasters go.  The Giants must believe so too, because they’re about to lock them up for six more years:

The Giants are close to bringing back two of their most prized free agents: television broadcasters Duane Kuiper and Mike Krukow. The club has reached tentative agreements on six-year extensions for the well-regarded duo. Both ended their playing careers with the Giants and have called their games for a generation … Though terms were not revealed, top local play-by-play and color announcers usually command $500,000 a year, or slightly more.

I didn’t realize how much local broadcasters made. Krukow and Kuiper probably deserve that if anyone does.  Some of you other guys?  Hey, good for you, but you’re basically stealing.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.