Ringolsby: don’t bar the PED users from the Hall of Fame

6 Comments

Tracy Ringolsby makes a point that I find to be eminently reasonable:

There is a strong feeling among some that amphetamines actually enhance performances over a broader base than steroids. What it all underscores is that over time, athletes, in any sport, are always looking for ways to gain an edge on the competition. When one advantage becomes commonplace or is outlawed, the search intensifies for a newer and better aid.

With the advancements in science over time, the methods for gaining that edge have become more sophisticated, which makes it more difficult to detect the usage. As a result, in evaluating greatness of athletes — in baseball and other sports — it is always wiser to evaluate who were the elite of their era, and not try to draw firm statistical comparisons from one era to another because the conditions change so drastically.

That’s why to blindly eliminate anyone even suspected of using steroids from Hall of Fame consideration is inconsistent from previous evaluations.

Good point.  Of course, how one can overlook steroids yet still find Mark McGwire lacking is a bit curious, but maybe like me Ringolsby is a “discounter” when it comes to known PED users (i.e. we don’t bar them, but we grade them downward).

Oh, and John Franco gets Ringolsby’s vote. I can’t say I recall seeing him get any other support.  I’m not gonna go crazy about this. I don’t like it when unworthy candidates get bona fide campaigns behind them like Jack Morris is getting, but I think the random votes to random people like Franco are kinda fun.  I’m just waiting to see if Lenny Harris gets a vote.

Anthony DeSclafani crushed a grand slam for his first career home run

Anthony DeSclafani
AP Images
1 Comment

Reds right-hander Anthony DeSclafani put on a show during Saturday’s matinee against the Cubs. Up 2-1 in the third inning, the hurler hooked a Brian Duensing fastball over the left field fence for his first career home run — and first career grand slam:

Grand slams are impressive no matter the player or situation, but they’re made all the more special in rare circumstances like this one. Not only is DeSclafani the first pitcher to deliver a grand slam in 2018, but he’s the first Reds hurler to do so in nearly 60 years. Per MLB.com’s Brian Scott Rippee, right-hander Bob Purkey was the last to hit a slam for the Reds in 1959, when he took Cubs reliever John Buzhardt deep in the third inning of a 12-3 drubbing.

The 28-year-old righty had a decent outing on the mound as well, holding the Cubs to two runs, four walks, and three strikeouts over 6 1/3 innings before passing the ball to reliever Michael Lorenzen. Entering Saturday, he carried a 2-1 record in three games, with a 4.60 ERA, 2.3 BB/9 and 8.6 SO/9 across 15 2/3 innings — not too shabby for someone who hasn’t pitched in the majors since 2016.

The Reds currently lead 8-2 in the bottom of the seventh.