How do you market the Royals?

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The biggest star on the Kansas City Royals was Zack Greinke. With him gone, James Dornbrook of KC Biz Beat wonders how the team will go about marketing itself.  He asked Royals spokesman Toby Cook. The response:

Cook said that right now, the Royals will focus on marketing the ball park and slowly introduce the minor-league players who are going to make up the core of the team from mid-2011 through the next few years.

“With the fact that we’re about to be named as having the No. 1 minor-league baseball system in all of baseball and that this trade made us even stronger, we feel like we can encourage our fan base and season-ticket holders that things are actually better now with our process of building,”

I don’t know much about marketing so maybe I’m out to lunch, but you’d think that Joakim Soria’s name would be mentioned in this kind of article at least once. I mean, he’s only one of the best closers in baseball.

Video: Cubs score run on Pirates’ appeal throw

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2019 has been one long nightmare for the Pirates. They’re in last place in the NL Central, have had multiple clubhouse fights, and can’t stop getting into bench-clearing incidents. The embarrassment continued on Sunday as the club lost 16-6 to the Cubs, suffering a three-game series sweep in Chicago.

One of those 16 runs the Pirates allowed was particularly noteworthy. In the bottom of the third inning, with the game tied at 5-5, the Cubs had runners on first and second with two outs. Tony Kemp hit a triple to right field, allowing both Ben Zobrist and Jason Heyward to score to make it 7-5. The Pirates thought one of the Cubs’ base runners didn’t touch third base on their way home. Reliever Michael Feliz attempted to make an appeal throw to third base, but it was way too high for Erik González to catch, so Kemp scored easily on the error.

The Pirates lost Friday’s game to the Cubs 17-8 and Saturday’s game 14-1. They were outscored 47-15 in the three-game series. According to Baseball Reference, since 1908, the Pirates never allowed 14+ runs in three consecutive games and only did it two games in a row twice before this series, in 1949 and in 1950. The Cubs scored 14+ in three consecutive games just one other time, in 1930.