I want some Atlanta Braves-branded Kattobashi

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More news that is not Cliff Lee-related:

Hundreds of baseball bats are broken by pro baseball players over the course of a season in the Nippon Professional Baseball league. The bits & pieces don’t go to waste, however, instead being reborn into cool chopsticks carrying NPB team names, colors and logos.

They’re called “Kattobashi,” a play on words from “KATTOBASE!!,” Japanese for “make a big hit” which is a term often heard (and heard often) at the ballpark. Also heard often is the crack of the bat – not only against the stitched horsehide sphere.

I don’t have much to say about this apart from “cool.”  Also, I want to know if Japanese newspapers include the price of Kattobashi chopsticks in the calculations for their bogus, trend-piece “what it costs to take a family to the ballpark” stories. You know, like the U.S. ones in which they include eight hot dogs, four large sodas, four boxes of popcorn, two replica jerseys, two giant foam “we’re number one!” fingers and tickets along the rail right next to the dugout, all before lamenting that a family can’t afford to go to the ballpark anymore.

You know, the essentials.

Report: Mike Redmond has interviewed for the Orioles’ manager job

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that former player and manager Mike Redmond is among those who has interviewed for the Orioles’ open managerial position. Those others include Mike Bell, Pedro Grifol, Chip Hale, and Brandon Hyde.

Redmond, 47, spent 13 years in the majors as a player from 1998-2010. He took over as manager of the Marlins in 2013 but had a short and unsuccessful stint. The team went 62-100 in his first year, 77-85 in his second, then went 16-22 to start the 2015 season before he was fired. It was hard to put too much blame on Redmond, though, considering that the Marlins have nearly perpetually been non-competitive over the last eight years.

Redmond has served as the bench coach with the Rockies for the last two years.

Whoever becomes the Orioles’ next manager will be taking over a team that went 47-115 in 2018. It was the first season in franchise history and one of the worst seasons of all time. The Orioles traded Manny Machado during the season to help facilitate a rebuilding process that will likely take a few years.