Earl Weaver insists he’s not dead

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Earl Weaver is not dead. We know this because he says so.

This is contrary to a political column in the New York Times on Saturday, which referred to Weaver in the past tense. “Texas Democrats have become the Baltimore Orioles of politics,” wrote Ross Ramsey. “Somewhere in heaven, Earl Weaver and Ann Richards are comparing notes on what went wrong with the teams they left behind.”

Mike Klingaman of the Baltimore Sun called Weaver, 80, at his home in Florida to notify him of the bad news:

“I’ll be damned,” said the Hall of Famer, who managed the Orioles to four American League pennants and a World Series title. “All I can do is say, that’s false.

“I’m still here, although my knees have given out, so I don’t play golf anymore. I’ve always said that there were two places that I wouldn’t mind dying. One was Memorial Stadium; the other, the golf course.

“Now I’ve got to wait forever [to go], because both of those places are gone.”

That’s it? I have to admit I’m disappointed that Weaver’s response wasn’t a little more colorful.

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The Cubs are considering a sportsbook at Wrigley Field

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With the nationwide ban on sports gambling gone — and with sports gambling regulations slowly being implemented on a state-by-state basis — any number of businesses are considering getting in on the action. Among those businesses are the Chicago Cubs.

ESPN reports that the club is considering opening gambling facilities in and around Wrigley Field which might include betting windows, automated kiosks or, possibly, a full, casino-style sportsbook. They’re characterized as preliminary discussions as the team awaits the Illinois governor’s signature on recently-passed legislation allowing gambling. The Cubs aren’t commenting, but a source tells ESPN that nothing has been done yet. It’s just talk at the moment.

If the Cubs move forward from the talking stage it will cost them a pretty penny: a four-year license will, under Illinois’ new law, cost them $10 million.

Now: let’s see the White Sox take some action this year. I can think of nothing more fun than sports gambling at what was once Comiskey Park on the 100th anniversary of the Black Sox scandal.