Blogger admits mistake; apologizes

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It’s always good to see bloggers be accountable for their mistakes. Even when the blogger doesn’t believe that he’s actually a blogger. Here’s Murray Chass, explaining his post in which he slammed Tom Verducci for voting against Marvin Miller for the Hall of Fame, even though Verducci voted for him:

When I reported his alleged no vote, I was basing it on what Miller told me he had heard. Miller was not wrong for telling me what he heard; I was wrong for reporting it without checking it. The blame is strictly mine.

In 99.99 percent – no, make that 100 percent – of previous articles or columns, I checked something like that and confirmed it to my satisfaction before writing it. I should have done that in this instance and not taken a shortcut, but I was unable to because I was out of the country on vacation with no access to information, such as telephone numbers or e-mail addresses, for people who might have known.

In retrospect, I should not have identified anyone as having voted against Miller; I should just have let the numbers speak for themselves. Had I subsequently been able to identify the nay-sayers, I could have then named them. It is a routine I would have followed in every other instance and should have this time. I regret that I did not. I further regret any embarrassment I might have caused Miller and Verducci.

We’re all wrong on occasion.  Good for Chass for owning it and apologizing. Would that more of us do that when we whiff.

UPDATE:  Joe Posnanski — who rarely rips people — completely eviscerates the Chass apology. I’ll admit that I didn’t think too hard about the quality of Chass’ apology when I linked it this morning. I was pleased enough to even see acknowledgement of an error, which we hardly ever see these days. But after reading Posnanski’s thing, I gotta admit: he nailed it.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?