Baseball’s average salary exceeds $3 million for the first time

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The Associated Press reports that the average salary in Major League Baseball has surpassed $3 million for the first time.  Here’s a breakdown of the average salaries and minimum salaries in Major League Baseball going back to 1967.  Two thoughts:

1) I remember back in the 80s when Sports Illustrated ran a story with all of the baseball players’ salaries listed from highest to lowest. On the cover was big-money-Mike Schmidt, topping the league with his $2 million and change salary. These days that’s below average.

2) For anyone who says that Marvin Miller isn’t a Hall of Famer, check out those 1967 salaries. The minimum was $6,000.  Even in 1967, that meant that ballplayers with families often had to take winter jobs to make ends meet.

I’m not suggesting that Miller’s Hall of Fame case is based just on salaries, but ask yourself: how much better is the quality of play today, when ballplayers can spend their winters recovering, conditioning and getting ready for the next season, than back in the days when they had to sell cars or dig graves or whatever?

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?