Baseball’s average salary exceeds $3 million for the first time

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The Associated Press reports that the average salary in Major League Baseball has surpassed $3 million for the first time.  Here’s a breakdown of the average salaries and minimum salaries in Major League Baseball going back to 1967.  Two thoughts:

1) I remember back in the 80s when Sports Illustrated ran a story with all of the baseball players’ salaries listed from highest to lowest. On the cover was big-money-Mike Schmidt, topping the league with his $2 million and change salary. These days that’s below average.

2) For anyone who says that Marvin Miller isn’t a Hall of Famer, check out those 1967 salaries. The minimum was $6,000.  Even in 1967, that meant that ballplayers with families often had to take winter jobs to make ends meet.

I’m not suggesting that Miller’s Hall of Fame case is based just on salaries, but ask yourself: how much better is the quality of play today, when ballplayers can spend their winters recovering, conditioning and getting ready for the next season, than back in the days when they had to sell cars or dig graves or whatever?

The Dodgers do not have a general manager, but they have an assistant general manager

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LAS VEGAS — Farhan Zaidi left his job as the general manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers to become the president of baseball operations for the San Francisco Giants. While Dodgers president Andrew Friedman remains at the top of the baseball operations department, Zaidi’s departure has left the Dodgers without a general manager. It happens. It also happens that the Dodgers do not plan to replace Zaidi with a new general manager any time soon. They just said so last week.

They do, however, have an assistant general manager now. It’s Jeff Kingston, late of the Seattle Mariners, where he served as Jerry Dipoto’s assistant. Now he is an assistant with no one, nominally, to assist. Seems like some sort of dividing by zero error, philosophically speaking, but we’ll just assume it’ll sort itself out.

Two less cosmic takeaways from this: 1. Kingston is an analytics guy who has typically advised the wheeler-dealer — Dipoto — so it’s fairly safe to assume he’ll do that in Los Angeles too; and 2. that a team is happy to proceed without a general manager should tell you where general managers, well, in general, stand in this age of title inflation in baseball front offices.

I imagine that, after some time in the organization, Kingston will be named the actual general manager with no real change in his duties, further underscoring that, in this day and age, the title of GM is like the value of a Zimbabwean dollar.