A series of very sad tweets by Jose Canseco

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Jose Canseco has taken to Twitter the past few days, talking about his desire to play baseball again. Among the more notable tweets:

  • I can dh for any major league team and lead the league in home runs,just give me the chance
  • I will show everyone that steroids are completely overrated once I get the chance to play aqgain.all I need is the chance
  • If a team would give me the chance I would not let them down.baseball is my life,I miss the game its part of me,its my addiction
  • I will not give up the dream of playing in the majors again,I just cant
  • If you love something and it defines you ,never give it up
  • I dream about playing almost every night.when I wake up and realize I am not anymore that’s when the nightmare begins
  • I am and will always be just simply a basball player,my tomb stone will just say. Baseball.
  • Why is everyone so negative,I will play again
  • Life is about beleivinging in something

Those last two came after many began to mock him in reply.

I won’t mock Jose Canseco. Not for this anyway.  He’s being honest about how he feels and there’s no crime in that.

But it’s hard not to pity him.  Because even if he had never become the poster child for PEDs in baseball and even if he had not exposed his former teammates and colleagues in his books, Canseco would not have a chance to play baseball again.  He’s 46-years-old. He hasn’t played truly competitive baseball for a decade. It’s not happening, and wouldn’t happen even if Canseco’s wasn’t blackballed from the game as he frequently claims.  He’s too old. He may be in physical shape, but he’s no longer in baseball shape. Baseball, even at its most meritocratic, is unforgiving in that way.

Canseco’s post-baseball life and career shows how extreme a gulf there is between that at which he excelled — putting a hurt on a baseball — and that to which he is left. Celebrity. Infamy. Based on some of his late night tweets I even imagine loneliness.  All players have adjustment problems to some degree or another, but Canseco’s seem quite extreme.

I hope that I’m just reading too much into some random tweets.  But if not, I hope Canseco gets some help. Because he sounds like he’s crying out for it.

Roger Clemens says he’s not running for Congress

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Apparently some people in Texas wanted Roger Clemens to run for Congress? At least enough people to where Clemens felt it necessary to tell Pete Olson, the congressman whose seat is going vacant due to his retirement, that, no, he had no interest in running for it.

From ESPN:

“The climate in politics at this time is much more than I would want to undertake, along with my family considerations,” Clemens said in a message to Olson that was obtained by ABC News.

“I am a Republican and I support our President and will continue to do so,” Clemens said. “No matter who our President may be, I will continue my support of them and root for them to be successful, just as I did when President Obama was in office.”

That’s a pretty diplomatic answer from Clemens. But even if he did not have family concerns and even if the “climate” disinterested him, I’m struggling to imagine Clemens as a viable political candidate in the first place.

For as good a pitcher as he was — and for as generally popular as he may be in Texas — the guy has some serious baggage, right? And I mean that beyond just the broad arc of the PEDs controversy that surrounded him for so long. The specifics of that controversy spun off his indictment for perjury before Congress, for example. He was acquitted — and I think it was a proper acquittal — but that was not exactly his finest hour.

It also led to a nasty battle of defamation lawsuits with a drug dealer that, remarkably, caused Clemens to come off way worse than the drug dealer, and that’s quite a trick. That whole process also revealed that he had an extraordinarily problematic extra-marital relationship with a now-dead country music singer. In all, it was a profound, 100% self-inflicted, reputation-trashing, public relations disaster that, even years later, he has taken no responsibility for. It was the sort of episode that, in addition to the ammo it might give any political opponent he may have, calls into serious questions Clemens’ judgment and sense of strategy, both of which are things that, to put it lightly, can be useful in politics.

Clemens, of course, is not going to cite any of those things as a reason for not wanting to run for office, nor does he have to. His simple “no” is all he needs to say and he can go back doing whatever it is he does for the Houston Astros.

But I am struggling mightily to understand why those people who are apparently encouraging him to run for office are doing so despite all of that being out there on the record. Is fame all that matters in politics now? Is a win bought by fame the be-all and end-all, even it means electing a candidate who is profoundly compromised both ethically and morally?

Haha, just kidding. You don’t need to answer that. I think we already know the answer.