The Angels sign Scott Downs to a three-year, $15 million contract

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UPDATE: Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com confirms it. The Angels have signed Downs to a three-year, $15 million contract. He could earn an additional $1 million based on games finished.

Downs, who turns 35 in March, posted a 2.64 ERA and 48/14 K/BB ratio over 61 1/3 innings this past season. The southpaw has a 2.36 ERA over 262 appearances since the beginning of the 2007 season.

Updating my previous entry, the Angels’ first-round pick (#14 overall) is protected in next year’s draft, so signing Downs (a Type A free agent) would cost them their second-round pick. If they signed Adrian Beltre — who has a higher Elias ranking — that pick would go to the Red Sox and the Blue Jays would receive the Angels’ third-round pick.

This isn’t exactly sticking it to the Red Sox for losing out on Crawford, but it’s obviously a little better than I originally thought. That being said, you would think this would have to take them out of the market for Rafael Soriano, right?

6:15 PM: Unless some “sick fake person” took over Peter Gammons’ Twitter account, it appears that the Angels may be close to signing Scott Downs to a three-year, $15 million contract.

That leaves me with this question. If signing Hisanori Takahashi to a two-year, $8 million contract was a “splash,” as Angels general manager Tony Regains described it the other day, would it be fair to classify Scott Downs as a tsunami?

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.